Roxanne Swentzell: Extraordinary People

By Herrin, Alica | Southwest Art, August 2002 | Go to article overview

Roxanne Swentzell: Extraordinary People


Herrin, Alica, Southwest Art


Roxanne Swentzell, a member of the Santa Clara Pueblo, is one of the most respected artists working today. Her figurative bronzes of Native American women, warriors, and clowns capture the beauty and dignity of her subjects, often with a touch of humor or self-awareness. In addition to having won several top awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Swentzell's work is in the permanent collections of museums around the world In Roxanne Swentzell: Extraordinary People, Santa Fe writer Gussie Fauntleroy teams up with the artist to discuss the major themes of her work and the ideas that led to some of her most acclaimed sculptures. "Any art she makes ... must be a full expression of herself and her experiences and observations of life," Fauntleroy writes in the introduction. "And it must be aimed at communicating with all people-Indian and non-Indian-about the things we share as humans."

DESPAIRING CLOWN, CLAY, 10 x 12 x 22.

"He's peeling off his stripes to see what's underneath," Roxanne explains. Even a Pueblo Clown, with wisdom born of having carefully observed human nature, needs to look within himself And if he does, you can be sure we all need to examine what's beneath the surface. Still, it often takes a desperate situation-even for a Clown-before we reach this point. "Our veneer, our masks, can sometimes become a prison in which we forget who we really are inside," Roxanne says. "We can spend our lives working to hold our outside image in place."

IN CRISIS, CLAY, 8 x 14 x 12.

When we accept the idea that we need to change the way we look or act in order to be beautiful, to be accepted or to fit in, we automatically reject a part of ourselves. It's a treacherous, self-destructive attitude, but it often affects us in subtle, insidious ways. In Roxanne's thinking, a healthy step has been taken when we become aware of the threat and struggle to fight it off, when we're terrified enough to grip the hand with its clawing, bright red nails and hold it at bay.

"She recognizes that these images of what she's supposed to be, especially from television, are an attack on her," Roxanne says of this figure.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Roxanne Swentzell: Extraordinary People
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.