The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue

By Engle, Michael R. | The Virginia Quarterly Review, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue


Engle, Michael R., The Virginia Quarterly Review


The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue, by Manuel Muñoz. Algonquin, May 2007. $12.95 paper

Muñoz's new collection continues to map out the charred emotional topography he first explored in Zigzagger, his well-received debut of 2003. Muted, intimate, and masterfully restrained, these overlapping stories offer brief, revealing glimpses into the lives of Mexican Americans and immigrants trying to make a go of it in hardscrabble industrial communities on the decline in and around Fresno, California. Low-budget strip malls, cheap hotels, used car lots, nighttime bus stations, and half-deserted shopping centers provide a melancholy backlight to the wearying trials of dead-end jobs, hopeless love affairs, and frayed family ties that characters must endure while trying to maintain their dignity and give some semblance of meaning to their lives. Muñoz's affecting combination of unsparing, sometimes lugubriously detailed realism and large-hearted tenderness lends the stories their suggestive delicacy and power. Each tale begins just after a traumatic turning point in its protagonist's life and only gradually releases the relevant clues to give meaning to the change. "Lindo y Querido," the first, and most exquisitely devastating story in the collection, depicts the inner struggle of an undocumented Mexican housekeeper to come to terms with the death of her son in a motorcycle crash. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.