The Listening Heart: Hymns with Biblical Reflections

By Hamilton, Donna | The Hymn, Autumn 2007 | Go to article overview

The Listening Heart: Hymns with Biblical Reflections


Hamilton, Donna, The Hymn


The Listening Heart: Hymns with Biblical Reflections by Genevieve Glen, OSB. Pordand, OR OCP Publications, 2006. 168 pp. No ISBN. U.S. $20.00.

OCP has produced two previous collections of hymns by Sister Genevieve, prioress of the Abbey of St. Walburga, Virginia Dale, CO. This volume contains 35 texts, all, as the subtide suggests, scripturally based. The poems are rich and varied, overflowing with detailed images. Sister Genevieve describes features of the natural world with a geologist's precision. She substitutes narrators for a fresh telling of a familiar story, such as the first-person account by one of the disciples who fished all night. And she fills in the gaps in the biblical record, as with a nine-stanza text about Joseph, who rates barely more than that number of verses in the Gospels.

The poetic delights in the texts alone would recommend this collection. But there is so much more. For every text the scripture references, a commentary, suggested uses and a musical setting are presented. Four pages are given to each set. First, the text appears printed as a poem, its meter and copyright data in a footnote. Opposite are listed the scripture references, commentary and suggested use. Turn the page to find the musical setting on one or two pages, the text interlined. The layout suggests the choices for using this book, as either a private or group devotional guide or as a songbook. One can experience the text either as a poem complete and distinct or as song lyrics. The two opportunities never present themselves to the eye at the same time, so the choice is valid.

The scripture references for each poem are numerous. A single image such as "wings" rates a mini-concordance. Specific citations are identified as pertinent to a particular stanza. Such an extensive list of scriptural references bespeaks the author's familiarity with biblical imagery and a fluency in transferring it to poetry. It prompts the reader to identify and explore those references and wonder: Could I find others? And so it encourages deeper search of scripture, always a good thing.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Listening Heart: Hymns with Biblical Reflections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.