Member Spotlight

By Miletski, Hani | Contemporary Sexuality, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Member Spotlight


Miletski, Hani, Contemporary Sexuality


Cory Silverberg, MEd

(Toronto, Canada)

Member Spotlight is a monthly column offering an opportunity for AASECT members to get to know more about each other. Each month, a different member's story will be introduced. If you would like to recommend someone to be interviewed for this column, please contact Hani Miletski, PhD, MSW, Membership Steering Committee chair, at Hani@DrMiletski.com.

Cory Silverberg grew up in the 1970s with copies of AASECT newsletters lying around the house. His father, Sy Silverberg, had been a family doctor who became a sex therapist and practiced in and around Toronto for over 25 years.

When Silverberg was 16 years old, his father got him a job at a sex store (the owners sold a book the elder Silverberg had written about premature ejaculation). Cory worked at the store until he completed his graduate studies.

"It was the best job I ever had," he says. "The owners encouraged my clinical and academic interest and paid for me to attend a one-day workshop on sex and disability and from there I decided to focus on sex research."

His undergrad thesis was a qualitative analysis (grounded theory) of the experience of sexuality for women with spinal cord injuries. His master's work was on sexuality and attachment theory.

Silverberg has a bachelor's degree in psychology from York University, and a masters' degree in counseling psychology from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, which is part of the University of Toronto. He divides his time between three sexuality careers. His "traditional" sexuality education focuses on helping people with disabilities. This includes everything from one-hour, in-service sessions in hospital settings to two-day intensives for personal care attendants.

Silverberg's second sexuality career is with the media, mostly behind the scenes. He works for SexTv, a documentary program tackling sex and gender issues, which is starting its 10th season. SexTv avoids titillation and allows people to represent their experience of sexuality in their own words. Silverberg also works for the producers of Talk Sex with Sue Johanson, which airs weekly on the Oxygen Network, and he occasionally does work for public radio in Canada. The bulk of his media work is as the sexuality guide for About.com, a New York Times company, which has over 50 million visitors every month. Silverberg writes about everything from sexual health to sex and technology to sex and religion, and he answers sex questions.

Silverberg was a founding member of the world's only sex store worker co-operative, Come As You Are, and he still oversees all their educational outreach programs - his third career. …

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