The Unconscious in Science and in Psychoanalysis

By Zemishlani, Hanna | The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, October 1, 2007 | Go to article overview
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The Unconscious in Science and in Psychoanalysis


Zemishlani, Hanna, The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences


The Unconscious in Science and in Psychoanalysis by Yehoyakim Stein The Hebrew University Magnes Press, 2005, Jerusalem. ISBN Number: 965-493-226-1, pp. 182

Stein's book, "The Unconscious in Science and in Psychoanalysis," is an intellectually challenging read that encourages all-encompassing and creative thinking as is the book's focus. The book presents the association between psychoanalysis and the metasciences including philosophy, sociology, history and the irrational elements.

The psychoanalysis of science has two meanings: first - the search for the dream beyond the objective (subjective, irrational, creative processes); second the epistemological obstacles of science. Psychoanalysis examines factors that are conscious and unconscious, cognitive and emotive underlying the basis of scientific processes. The subjectivity of science is not unique to isolated scientists but is rather an integral part of the discipline and the cause of unconscious lacunas that systematically undermine the product of scientific investigation. Locating these lacunas and exposing the suppressed may enable the development of novel ideas.

The author does not hold the notion that the shoemaker has to go bare-foot, and hence he deals with the psychoanalysis of the psychoanalytic theory and tries to point out the existence of irrational factors underlying the development of the psychoanalytic domain.

He offers a system which enables psychoanalytic research of the psychoanalytic science by interpretative inspection of texts. As a guideline for the system, metaphors, scientific lapses, lacunas and scientific myths are used.

Stein focuses mainly on analyzing three categories of lacunas: The lacuna of the inner body which stems from primeval fears and anxieties; the lacuna of the post-traumatic dream which connects to the unconscious aim to avoid any impairment to the wholeness of the psychoanalytic theory of Freud; and the lacuna of the split psychoanalytic consciousness theory, which reflects the gap between the meta-analytic principles (what we wish to see) and the reality that we actually meet in the clinic.

The author refers to the inner body of women (the womb and especially the menstrual cycle) as representative of the inner body, and gives it a large space as representative of scientific lacunas.

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