Academic Career Opportunities in Entrepreneurial Marketing: Revisiting Teach & Miles (1997)

By Teach, Richard D.; Miles, Morgan P. et al. | Journal of Entrepreneurship Education, January 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Academic Career Opportunities in Entrepreneurial Marketing: Revisiting Teach & Miles (1997)


Teach, Richard D., Miles, Morgan P., Hansen, David J., Journal of Entrepreneurship Education


ABSTRACT

This study is designed to update and extend Teach and Miles' (1997) empirical study of the career opportunities for marketing academics who have an interest in entrepreneurship. The 1997 study found that entrepreneurship was becoming a more accepted research area in marketing but was not yet well established within marketing departments. In fact, at the time of that study, more than 80 percent of schools offering entrepreneurship housed it in the management area. The current study shows that some progress has been made in entrepreneurship courses being offered by marketing departments, although there is room available for more progress. The results of this study also suggest that entrepreneurship has still not been fully embraced by the marketing discipline, as have areas such as channels management, consumer behavior, or marketing research. Our position is that many of the core issues of marketing such as value creation, satisfaction, and exchanges are facilitated when a firm acts more entrepreneurially.

INTRODUCTION

The past decade has seen a dramatic rise in the number and status of entrepreneurship programs in schools of business and management. The popularity of entrepreneurship courses has increased dramatically among both graduate and undergraduate students.. .Despite the increase in popularity within the field; there has also been considerable resistance from within the faculties of many institutions to the expansion of entrepreneurship programs. Faculty outside the field have been, and many remain, very skeptical about the validity of entrepreneurship as an academic field, the quality and rigor of entrepreneurship research and the need to hire academic faculty to teach and research in the field (Finkle and Deeds 2001).

Recent research by Finkle and Deeds (2001:627) found that since the 1993/94 academic year the entrepreneurship field has become somewhat of a "seller's market," at least for well trained management academics; and since then, has experienced strong and consistent growth in the number of tenure track positions. This growing interest in entrepreneurship education in collegiate schools of business appears to be widespread and includes degree/executive education programs, outreach efforts, internship programs, business plan competitions, and secondary and primary education outreach programs (Solomon, Duffy, & Tarabishy 2002). While Solomon, Duffy, and Tarabishy (2002) classified the level of participating institution, from two-year community colleges to international universities, they did not report on where entrepreneurship programs were located with in the business school (for example in the management department, the marketing department or the technology school).

A common, and long standing, perception is that much of this growth in entrepreneurship programs has been primarily in management or strategic management departments, strengthening the "academic ownership" of entrepreneurship by the management discipline. In addition, business schools with very strong academic reputations are creating entrepreneurship discipline based doctoral programs to "provide pure entrepreneurship faculty" (Kuratko 2005: 588).

However, for decades marketing scholars have also had an interest in entrepreneurship in terms of the unique marketing issues that are faced by individual entrepreneurs, corporate entrepreneurs, family and small businesses, and social entrepreneurs. For example, in a recent discussion of the evolution of research in entrepreneurship Kuratko (2006) categorizes a marketing academic whose career has been devoted to the development of the marketing / entrepreneurship interface, Gerald E. Hills, as one of the significant pioneers in the field of entrepreneurship research who has been instrumental in the legitimization of entrepreneurship as an academic discipline. Hills and LaForge (1992) suggest that an understanding of entrepreneurship may be enhanced by the perspective, research traditions, and alternative philosophical orientations that marketing offers. …

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