The Caregiving Experience among Hispanic Caregivers of Dementia Patients

By Mier, Nelda | Journal of Cultural Diversity, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

The Caregiving Experience among Hispanic Caregivers of Dementia Patients


Mier, Nelda, Journal of Cultural Diversity


Abstract: This research reviewed studies that investigated factors influencing the caregiving experience among informal Hispanic caregivers of dementia patients. This review identified 24 journal articles published between 1985 and 2003. Variables studied were depression and social support. In addition, methodological issues were detected such as sampling bias and multiple measurements. This review concluded that there is a need for an extensive, in depth research of the caregiving experience among Hispanics and further research needs are discussed.

Key Words: Nursing, Hispanic Caregivers, Dementia Patients

The health status and healthcare needs of Hispanic informal caregivers of individuals suffering from dementia have become a significant issue as the Hispanic population has increased rapidly and has become the largest minority group in the United States. There is, however, a scarce literature exploring what is known about the dementia caregiving role and its importance among the Hispanic population, about the caregiving experience effects on the physical and mental nealth of Hispanic caregivers, and/or about existing services and interventions for Hispanic caregivers of dementia patients.

Understanding the dementia caregiving experience is of crucial importance. An expanding body of research based mainly on samples predominantly Anglo suggests that informal caregivers of elderly individuals suffering from dementia are valuable assets for the American healthcare system. Informal caregivers may offer to an elderly demented family member the opportunity to be cared for in the most humane way possible, and at the same time informal caregivers may play an important role in delaying institutionalization of dementia patients and, consequently, in reducing social and economic costs (Arno, Levine, & Memmott, 1999). Yet, caregiving for an elderly person suffering from dementia can be an overwhelming experience resulting in negative health outcomes for the caregiver. Studies have shown that caregivers of dementia patients experience stress, burden, and/or depression (Braekhus, Oksengard, Engedal, & Laake, 1998; Brodaty & Luscombe, 1998; Donaldson, Tarrier, & Burns, 1998; Leinonen, Korpisammal, Pulkkinen, & Pukuri, 2001; Lim, Sahadevan, Choo, & Anthony, 1999; Prescop, Dodge, Morycz, Schulz, & Ganguli, 1999; Sparks, Farran, Donner, & Keane-Hagerty, 1998).

Extensive findings about the dementia caregiving experience based on Anglo samples, however, may not truly represent the experience and needs of other ethnic groups (Connell & Gibson, 1997; Yeo, 1996). If ethnicity can be conceptualized as symbols that individuals use to create identity and meaning and to act, think or feel (Hinton, Fox, & Levkoff, 1999; Phinney, 1996), there is not doubt that the caregiving experience "can be shaped by culturally-based ideas about the caregiver's role, idioms of distress or "burden," ideas about what constitutes "good" or "bad" care, family interactional styles, and views of "normal" and "abnormal" aging" (Hinton et al., 1999, p. 407). Thus, ethnic differences in dementia illness experiences have received increased attention in the past ten years by the American public sector. According to Aranda (2001), there are relevant governmental and non-governmental efforts that highlighted the need for the inclusion of racial and ethnic minorities in research related to dementia, including (1) the federal government requirement to include women and minorities in federally funded research, (2) a workshop held at the 52nd scientific meeting of the Gerontological Society of America in 1999 presenting a series of papers related to this ethnic/racial and research issue, (3) a new wave of federally sponsored studies to address issues of recruitment and retention of older minority adults, and (4) the 1999-2003 Long Range Plan of the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

Given the importance of the growing Hispanic population there is a need for a comprehensive review of recent research about Hispanic dementia caregivers not only exploring the association between ethnicity and the caregiving experience, but a review that would also describe and analyze findings about other aspects of the dementia caregiving such as difficulties in accessing healthcare services, existing interventions for Hispanic caregivers, and cultural assessments, among other issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Caregiving Experience among Hispanic Caregivers of Dementia Patients
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.