Enhance Student Advising and Academic and Life Supports

By Kiker, Jason | Techniques, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Enhance Student Advising and Academic and Life Supports


Kiker, Jason, Techniques


THIS ARTICLE IS PART OF A YEARLONG SERIES THAT WILL MORE CLOSELY EXAMINE THE RECOMMENDATIONS MADE IN ACTE'S POSTSECONDARY REFORM POSITION STATEMENT AND HIGHLIGHT BEST PRACTICES FOR IMPLEMENTING EACH OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS. TO ACCESS THE COMPLETE POSITION STATEMENT, VISIT WWW.ACTEONLINE. ORG/POLICY/LEGISLATIVE_ISSUES/ POSTSECONDARY.CFM.

THE FIFTH RECOMMENDATION IN ACTE'S POSTSECONDARY REFORM POSITION PAPER IS TO ENHANCE student advising and academic and life supports. The availability of effective student supports can play a critical role in student enrollment, persistence and completion of postsecondary credentials. Guidance and advising is vital to help students select programs that match well with their interests and skills. Additionally, helping them address life challenges that they may face outside the classroom can play a tremendous role in whether students succeed in postsecondary education or not.

Innovative solutions are needed from states and postsecondary institutions that will provide students with career, academic and financial aid guidance, as well as strengthen funding for student services and career counseling. Students in secondary and postsecondary education should have access to the information they need to make thoughtful decisions about choosing their career path, setting career and life goals, and finding the educational options suitable to reach those goals. Students of all ages need to clearly understand the various education and training possibilities that are available to help them pursue opportunities and achieve success in the 21st century.

When students don't have knowledge of their educational options and there are not clear paths to help them from one place to another, many drop out of the system and do not get the education needed to move them to the next level or toward their career goals. Outstanding career counseling for all students is just the starting point for implementation of this recommendation. In addition to the need for effective career counseling, many students begin their postsecondary education with academic, family, financial and other challenges that make staying continuously enrolled in a multi-year program of study difficult. Supports are needed to address students' academic needs, career goals and life circumstances.

The Puente Project

The Puente Project was created at Chabot Community College in Hayward, California, in 1981 by a community college counselor and an English professor who were concerned about the high dropout rate for Latino and Hispanic students. When the pilot program proved highly effective in student retention and academic performance, Puente 's mission was refocused to prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The success of the program model has led to its replication in 56 community colleges.

Puente's model includes an academically challenging curriculum, support networks of specially trained teachers, professors and counselors and outreach programs to involve parents, families and members of the local community. Application of this model begins with teams of school and college faculty being trained in Puente's specific rigorous instruction, academic counseling focused on individual students' needs, and finding community members to be mentors. Puente's model works because it addresses a broad cross section of challenges that students face. By participating in the program, students gain a familiarity with the overall social and educational systems which help them find clear paths between high schools and postsecondary education and training.

The mentoring and outreach programs help students find role models in other students, teachers and the community. Parents are given access to and understanding of information and resources that are important for them to help their children, and understand their educational and career interests. Students in Puente schools have a focused and sustained academic plan that leads them to the completion of the steps necessary to achieve their postsecondary education goals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Enhance Student Advising and Academic and Life Supports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.