Army Aviation: SUPPORTING THE SOLDIER

By Bogosian, Paul | Army, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Army Aviation: SUPPORTING THE SOLDIER


Bogosian, Paul, Army


With the termination of the Comanche program in 2004, the Army began an Aviation transformation with a focus on modernizing the current fleet of aircraft and procuring new, state-of-the-art aircraft to more effectively operate in current and emerging combat environments. In support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), Army Aviation platforms have already flown nearly two million flight hours. In the past year alone, our systems have flown more than half a million flight hours supporting the global war on terrorism. These numbers reflect a 200 to 300 percent increase over the peacetime operational tempo (OPTEMPO); maintaining this pace results in a large amount of wear and tear on our systems. Our challenge is to continue to provide this heightened level of support to the warfighters while simultaneously maintaining and modernizing our fleet.

While operating our systems at this elevated pace, our maintainers have managed to sustain outstanding readiness rates. For example, the venerable Kiowa Warrior received an availability rate of 15 percent higher than the Army standard in October 2007, while sustaining a monthly OPTEMPO in excess of 80 hours per aircraft. Even in the demanding Southwest Asia environment, the fleet of Army aircraft is easily surpassing its standard mission capability rate.

Such statistics are primarily attributable to the aggressive and proactive maintenance accomplished by our personnel deployed worldwide. Initiatives such as condition-based maintenance and soldier-focused logistics were put in place to ensure that we conduct appropriate, timely maintenance actions and that we have the parts we need when we need them in order to keep our aircraft in the fight. Maintaining our ability to support the soldier will continue to be our primary focus.

Since the conclusion of the Cold War, the operational environment our soldiers face has been constantly evolving. Army Aviation has the daunting task of staying in front of an enemy that is changing its tactics on a regular basis. Modernizing the fleet is a very important aspect of supporting the warfighter. Not only are new aircraft-including the Apache, Black Hawk and Chinook-being delivered to the Army every month, but we are also constantly developing and testing more modern, updated systems within the aircraft in order to better protect the soldier, help him complete the mission and better maintain the aircraft. In addition, the Army has signed production contracts for new platforms, such as the light utility helicopter and the Joint cargo aircraft, with capability requirements unique to the new and anticipated operational environments.

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are providing even further support to the soldiers in the field by performing surveillance and reconnaissance operations without putting soldiers' lives at risk. These systems are already in theater and have flown more than 300,000 hours in support of OIF and OEF. Because of the increased demand for the capabilities that these systems provide, the Army is continuing to develop and procure new unmanned aircraft. For example, 157 Raven B small unmanned aerial vehicles have been delivered to the Army and are headed to theater, and a second production contract is being finalized to purchase additional Ravens.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Army Aviation: SUPPORTING THE SOLDIER
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.