AUSA Sustaining Member Profile: Harris Corporation

Army, January 2008 | Go to article overview

AUSA Sustaining Member Profile: Harris Corporation


Corporate Structure-Founded in 1895. Number of employees: 15,000. Chairman, President and CEO: Howard L Lance. Headquarters: 1025 W. NASA Blvd., Melbourne, f L 32919. Web site: www.harris.com.

Harris Corporation is an international communications and information technology company providing state-of-the-art communications solutions for military, government and commercial customers in more than 150 countries. Headquartered in Melbourne, FIa., Harris develops products, systems, software and services in radio frequency (RF) communications, broadcast communications, government communications and wireless transmission solutions. The company's 15,000 employees are dedicated to helping customers integrate and manage assured communications solutions across a wide range of applications.

Harris designs, develops and manufactures tactical radios and related products that enable the Army to communicate securely and reliably, while remaining mobile in highly demanding environments. The company provides state-of-the-art communications and information networks, equipment and systems integration services, and information technology services for the Department of Defense, as well as federal agencies and international customers. The company is committed to serving the complex communication requirements of the U.S. Army.

Innovative Harris radio products, including HF (high frequency), VHF and multiband systems, are in broad use throughout the Army. Harris' latest generation of software-defined tactical radios offers the Army a near-term transition path to meeting key LandWarNet capability objectives. With the Army's needs in mind, Harris developed the Falcon® III family of multiband, multimission tactical radio products. The Falcon III family builds on the success of the software-defined Falcon® Il AN/PRC-117F(C) and the AN/PRC-150(C) radios, which expanded the role of a traditional, combat radio from a single-mode SINCGARS VHF line-of-sight radio to a multimission solution. The Falcon III architecture employs the Joint tactical radio system (JTRS) program Software Communications Architecture (SCA), ensuring interoperability with legacy and future waveforms.

The Falcon III AN/PRC-152(C) single-channel, multiband handheld radio provides multimission capabilities in both a battery-operated dismount and high-powered vehicular configurations. The AN/PRC-152 is the first JTRS-approved radio to be certified SCA-compliant without waivers. Providing SINCGARS ground-to-ground, Havequick close-air support and UHF tactical satellite communications, the AN/PRC-152(C) provides the warfighter multimission operational capability not available in legacy systems.

Accelerating its transition to JTRS, the Army has fielded more than 14,000 JTRS-approved AN/PRC-152(C) handheld radios through its deployment of the Falcon III AN/VRC-110 dual-channel 50-watt vehicular transceivers. Based on the handheld AN/PRC-152(C), the system provides a rapid "grab-and-go" capability when removed from the vehicle, a critical capability in urban environments.

Harris is responding to the Army's need for network-centric communications in both tactical and fixed-station environments. Three new products were recently introduced that significantly increase tactical communications data rates and provide IP-based connectivity for seamless network integration. …

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AUSA Sustaining Member Profile: Harris Corporation
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