Entrepreneurship Education

By Faulk, Marguerite R. | New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Entrepreneurship Education


Faulk, Marguerite R., New England Journal of Entrepreneurship


Entrepreneurship Education Patricia G. Greene and Mark P. Rice, eds., Entrepreneurship Education, Cheltenham, UK: Edgar Elgar Publishing Limited, 2007. 543 pages, $225.

Marguerite R. Faulk

Entrepreneurship Education is the ninth book in the series entitled The International Library of Entrepreneurship. Edited by Patricia Green, provost of Babson College, and Mark Rice, Murata Dean of the Olin Graduate School of Business at Babson, this book is a comprehensive collection of outstanding articles on entrepreneurship education written over the past 15 years. Readers already actively engaged in teaching entrepreneurship will recognize many familiar names throughout this collection. As the editors state in their introduction entitled "Entrepreneurship Education: Moving from 'Whether' to 'What', 'How' and 'Why'," the focus of this collection is on entrepreneurship education, rather than entrepreneurship learning. This book is a must-read for anyone teaching this subject at the collegiate level.

The "Whether" section of this book contains nine articles collected in Part I, "Perspectives on Entrepreneurship Education." The perspectives are diverse, covering not only historical perspectives with the first two articles encompassing 10 years of literature on the subject, but also perspectives on the lack of doctoral programs in entrepreneurship by Brush et al., lack of theoretical links between entrepreneurship educational research and the educational field itself, and entrepreneurial education for engineering and science students. Of particular note are the articles exploring successful entrepreneurs' views on education and African American students' views on entrepreneurial education.

If you have ever wondered just where your entrepreneurship program belongs in your educational setting, the last article in Part I is for you. For those of us who have experienced our entrepreneurship classes buried in our business curriculums and relegated to the elective status, rather than as a core curriculum, Hindle's "Teaching Entrepreneurship at University: From the Wrong Building to the Right Philosophy" will give you the tools to design your entrepreneurial curriculum. This highly readable article suggests that "vocational transcendence," rather than an "overly vocational and mechanistic curriculum design" is the key to designing an effective, reflective curriculum (p. 153, 154).

Part II of this interesting collection encompasses the "What" of education: what knowledge, what skills, and what attitudes have been and are currently being taught in our educational institutions.Those engaged in institutional effectiveness and charged with creating specific course objectives or competencies will find Bird's article, "Learning Entrepreneurship Competencies: The Self-Directed Learning Approach," particularly helpful. An interesting parallel between management studies, especially team leadership, is drawn in the article in this section by Harrison and Leitch (1994). These authors suggest that entrepreneurship education and traditional management education are not mutually exclusive, but instead can enrich each other.

The last article in Part II draws on failure, rather than success, as a means to educate future entrepreneurs. Shepherd (1994) notes that if entrepreneurs are invited as guest speakers in classrooms, these invited guests are usually those who have been highly successful. This author believes as much or perhaps even more can be learned from studying failed entrepreneurs, particularly in helping our future entrepreneurs process the emotions they experience if their entrepreneurial venture is not successful.

Part III of the book details how entrepreneurship has been taught in higher education over the past decade.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Entrepreneurship Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.