At the Museum


AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

EXHIBITIONS

Water: H2O = Life

Through May 26, 2008

Live animals, hands-on exhibits, and stunning dioramas invite the whole family to explore the beauty and essence of water and reveal one of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century: humanity's sustainable management and use of this life-giving, but finite, resource.

Water: H2O = Life is organized by the American Museum of Natural History, New York (www.amnh.org), and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul (www.smm.org), in collaboration with Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland; The Field Museum, Chicago; Instituto Sangari, São Paulo, Brazil; National Museum of Australia, Canberra; Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto; San Diego Natural History Museum; and Singapore Science Centre with PUB Singapore.

The American Museum of Natural History gratefully acknowledges the Tamarind Foundation for its leadership support of Water H2O = Life, and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future for its assistance.

Exclusive corporate sponsorship for Water: H2O = Life is provided by JPMorgan.

Water: H2O = Life is supported by a generous grant from the National Science Foundation.

The support of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is appreciated. The Museum extends its gratitude to the Panta Rhea Foundation, Park Foundation, and Wege Foundation for their support of the exhibition's educational programming and materials.

Images of the word "water" in different languages projected on a dramatic fog screen greet visitors as they enter the exhibition.

The Butterfly Conservatory

Through May 26, 2008

Mingle with up to 500 live, free-flying tropical butterflies, and learn about the butterfly life cycle, defense mechanisms, evolution, and conservation.

Beyond

Through April 6, 2008

Exquisite images from unmanned space probes take visitors on a journey through the alien and varied terrain of our planetary neighbors.

The presentation of Beyond at the American Museum of Natural History is made possible by the generosity of the Arthur Ross Foundation.

Unknown Audubons: Mammals of North America

Through August 2008

The stately Audubon Gallery showcases gorgeously detailed depictions of North American mammals by John James Audubon, best known for his bird paintings.

Major funding for this exhibition has been provided by the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Endowment Fund.

Public programs are made possible, in part, by the Rita and Frits Markus Fund for Public Understanding of Science.

GLOBAL WEEKENDS

International Polar Weekend

Friday, 2/1, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, 2/2 and 2/3, 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.

Come celebrate the International Polar Year with performances, short lectures, film clips with commentary, and an interactive "Polar Fair."

www.amnh.org/polar

In collaboration with Barnard College, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Columbia University, with funding from the National Science Foundation.

African American Heritage Day: Passing the Torch: Blues, Tap, Swing

Saturday, 2/23, 1:00-5:00 p.m.

With performances by Marlon Saunders, Mickey Davidson Savoy Swingers, and four generations of tappers from the Ruth Williams Dance Studio.

www.amnh.org/blackhistory

This event is reproduced by Community Works and the New Heritage Theatre Croup under the artistic direction of Sistah Aziza.

Global Weekends are made possible, in part, by the City of New York, the New York City Council, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Additional support has been provided by the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., the Tolan Family, and the family of Frederick H. Leonhardt.

LECTURES

A book signing follows each lecture.

Our Human Origins

Wednesday, 2/6, 6:30 p. …

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