Time Being: Difficulties in Integrating Arts in Health

By Eades, Guy; Ager, Jacqui | The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Time Being: Difficulties in Integrating Arts in Health


Eades, Guy, Ager, Jacqui, The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health


Abstract

A programme of 'arts as healthcare', Time Being (TB), was established and delivered as arts on prescription (AoP) by Healing Arts on the Isle of Wight over the period October 2002-March 2005. Its aim was to demonstrate and identify the benefits arising to an individual's health as a result of participation in structured creative programmes and activity, with the objective of the programme becoming part of the locally commissioned NHS services of the primary care trust. Evaluation and testimony from participants demonstrate the impact creativity has in contributing to the improvement in health of an individual and the individual's appreciation and understanding of their own health. The response to the evaluation by the commissioning sector of the NHS, primary care trust, indicates the difficulties and reluctance of this sector to embrace and commission arts in health programmes. The conclusion is that providers such as Healing Arts are required to undertake further detailed cost-benefit, cash-efficiency, and quantified health-gain analysis on the role of arts and creativity as part of healthcare for it to become integrated into NHS healthcare delivery.

Key words

arts on prescription; mental health; integration; health service; creativity

INTRODUCTION

Healing Arts is a department of the Isle of Wight Healthcare NHS Trust. It was set up in 1985 with the brief to provide a comprehensive range of highquality programmes linking the arts with healthcare for people who are recovering from illness in hospital, receiving healthcare at home or in the community, or who are living with a life-altering health condition.

The work of Healing Arts and its development in providing a range of arts in health programmes across the community, served by a district general hospital and community healthcare, is well documented.1-7,18

In 2000 Healing Arts formed a partnership with 19 other statutory and voluntary organisations to form The Isle of Wight Healthy Living Centre (IoW HLC) and to win a grant of £1 million from the New Opportunities Lottery Fund (NOF), over a five-year term, to develop and promote projects and programmes as part of the nationwide HLCs initiative.

Healing Arts proposed two programmes that would seek to establish the link between the arts, creativity and health, and to begin the process of identifying and quantifying the health gains that arise from these activities of arts as part of healthcare.

The two programmes - Time Being (TB) arts in prescription (AoP) and 'Sounds Lively! Choirs' were set up as pilots with strong participant involvement in the evolution of their style and method of delivery, with ongoing consultation and feedback. It was also a key objective from the outset, and part of the NOF's consent to award a grant, to establish the IoW HLC as a stand-alone organization with a majority managing group drawn from persons receiving healthcare or representing patient groups. Their role was to advance the concept and understanding of the healthcare issues arising from the IoW HLC and to seek the agreement of the commissioning department of the NHS - the primary care trust (PCT) - to take forward the funding of the programmes and integrate the structure of the HLC as part of the NHS for the Isle of Wight.

TB had built into its design and delivery schedule an evaluation methodology, based on guidance notes already used in the Isle of Wight Primary Care Mental Health Team (PCMHT).17

TIME BEING

TB was designed by Healing Arts for people living with mild to moderate mental health conditions.

The main aim of the programme has been to help participants regain control over their lives, and for them to develop a medium- to long-term plan for their own mental and social well-being. It was designed to offer individuals the opportunity to find time for themselves outside a medical definition of their health needs, in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Time Being: Difficulties in Integrating Arts in Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.