Fred D. Wright, Ed.D.: (1946-1994)

By Liese, Bruce S. PhD | Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, January 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

Fred D. Wright, Ed.D.: (1946-1994)


Liese, Bruce S. PhD, Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy


Fred D. Wright, III, Ed.D., died on April 8,1994. Fred had been the Director of Education at the Center for Cognitive Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania, under the direction of Dr. Aaron T. Beck. In this role he had many teaching, administrative, and patient care responsibilities, but Fred will certainly be most remembered for his nurturant, caring, compassionate disposition, accentuated by his kind, gentle smile and his heart-warming laugh. Fred was the quintessential Teddy Bear.

Fred received his Bachelors degree from the University of Maryland in 1975 and his Masters and Doctoral degrees from Ball State University in 1977 and 1980. Fred's interest in cognitive therapy first became strong when he organized a Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) training workshop at Frankfort Regional Medical Center in Germany (where he completed his psychology internship). Upon returning to the United States, Fred enrolled in the RET Primary Certificate Program, which he completed in 1983. Hungry for further knowledge and stimulation, Fred completed the Clinical Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cognitive Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania in 1985. At the time of his graduation from the program Dr. Beck hired Fred as a Clinical Associate at the Center, and he was quickly promoted to Director of Education. Fred enjoyed writing about his experiences as a cognitive therapist, which led to his recent coauthorship of a text with Drs. Beck, Newman, and Liese on The Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse.

In addition to lecturing internationally, Fred welcomed international visitors and students to the Center for Cognitive Therapy in a manner that made them feel right at home. As a result of his warmth, Fred became well-known and well-loved worldwide. Friends and colleagues at the Center described him exclusively in positive, endearing terms. Dr. Beck described him as a "really very outstanding cognitive therapist. …

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