Employment Branding for Generation X and Generation X

Workforce Management, April 21, 2008 | Go to article overview

Employment Branding for Generation X and Generation X


CAREER BUILDER

Faced with a large number of Baby Boomers retiring and smaller generations of replacement workers entering the workforce, hiring managers are voicing concern over their ability to fill vacant positions with skilled staff. In the 2007 Employment Dynamics and Growth Expectations (EDGE) Report, nine out of ten employers said finding good workers was more difficult today than compared to a year ago, and roughly the same number believe it will be equally or more challenging to recruit qualified candidates 12 months from now.

With today's shrinking labor market, it is important for hiring managers to position their company as a place where candidates want to work. This enables you to receive more attention from qualified candidates and more opportunities to fill your staff with talented employees. But branding your company requires that you really understand the candidate you are looking to attract. Two generations that make up a key part of today's labor force are Generation Y and Generation X. Knowing what it is that members of these groups are interested in helps you position your company to attract the specific candidate you need.

By examining what makes each of these generations tick and how to best reach these candidates, this white paper helps you brand your company as the "Place to Work."

Generation Y:

Generation Y is the fastest-growing segment of the workforce and the largest generation since the Baby Boomers. This group, composed of those born between 1977 and 1994, accounts for over 70 million people in the U.S. and makes up over 20% of today's population. Generation Y not only helps fill in for the number of missing workers the Baby Boom generation is leaving behind; they also bring fresh ideas and an enthusiastic and motivated workforce.

To say that this group is in high demand in the workforce is an understatement. Employers planned to hire 19.2 percent more new graduates in 2007 than in 2005-2007, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers. Recruiting and retaining this new group entering the workforce has already proven to be a challenge. As Generation Y is coming of age and arriving in the workplace, they present employers with new ideas about the employment experience, namely, "Why should I work for you?"

Generation Y grew up with technology and grew up playing largely by their own rules. So for your company to be intriguing to Generation Y, your brand must reflect things like flextime, tuition reimbursement for continuing education, and a relaxed work environment. Because these job seekers like to work hard and play hard, it would be beneficial for you to show that you share this idea in everything you do at your company. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Employment Branding for Generation X and Generation X
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.