Higher Geography: Environmental Interactions

By Selmes, Ian | Teaching Geography, Autumn 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Higher Geography: Environmental Interactions


Selmes, Ian, Teaching Geography


Higher Geography: Environmental Interactions Martin Duddin, David Russell, Oliver Bray, Jim Bruce, Morven Archer and Gordon Lobban £16.99 Paisley: Hodder Gibson, 2006 Pb, 216pp, 21x27.5cm ISBN 978 0340 915844

Before long, changing specifications in England will mean a reduction in the number offered by each examination board. Subject matter in schools will also be narrowed in linked textbooks. As so often in the past, a look across the border to Scotland can provide both guidance for the future and some refreshing study materials for geographers to use in the classroom.

Scottish Higher Geography consists of three units of study: physical environments, human environments and environmental interactions. The third has six options, of which a student will study two. This largely revised second edition textbook considers the four most popular options: rural land resources, rural land degradation, urban change and its management, and development and health. Each of these options gives a flavour of the units in the next version of AS/A2 courses, wherein traditional topics such as glaciation and development are studied in a geographical context, such as land resources and quality of life. River basin management in either Africa or North America and European regional inequalities are the other options that teachers generally do not consider have appeal to students.

This full-colour book has up-to-date photographs, clearly constructed sketch maps, annotated flow, block and 2D diagrams, as well as graphs. The variety and clarity of layout make for easy understanding. Every few pages there are question boxes that reinforce and highlight key language, relationships and skills.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Higher Geography: Environmental Interactions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?