President's Report to the Membership, 2008

By DeBlack, Thomas A. | The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

President's Report to the Membership, 2008


DeBlack, Thomas A., The Arkansas Historical Quarterly


2007 MARKED THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY of the crisis at Little Rock Central High School, and there were several conferences dedicated to that momentous episode. One of the most significant and best attended was the annual meeting of the Arkansas Historical Association, held April 26-28 in Little Rock. Laura Miller, Sarah Gadberry, Tim Nutt, and Susan Young put together an excellent program, and Gary Cox handled the local arrangements. Concurrent sessions met at the Central Arkansas Library System's main branch and the Historic Arkansas Museum. Former Senator Dale Bumpers gave the keynote address before a packed house at the Old State House Museum, and two members of the Little Rock Nine attended the closing session at Central High School. The awards banquet was held in the ballroom of the Clinton Library, affording a magnificent view of the city.

The 2008 meeting offers a real change of pace, both in location and theme. Eureka Springs, one of the state's most unique towns, hosts the event, and the program is entitled "Land of Eccentricity." Tim Nutt has lined up a varied selection of presentations that should make for one of our organization's most interesting gatherings. Susan Young is handling local arrangements. Because of scheduling conflicts, we moved this year's meeting up to March 27-29.

There was little change in the membership of the AHA board of trustees last year, but 2008 will see the most dramatic turnover in recent memory. In addition to losing several longtime members, we will have a completely new group of officers. I will be ending my second term as president, Ben Johnson is finishing his tenure as vice-president, and Jeannie Whayne is stepping down after eighteen years of distinguished service as secretary-treasurer. We have a promising slate of nominees to fill these positions, and I have no doubt that the board will be in very good hands as we head into the coming years.

The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, under the leadership of Patrick Williams, continues to be a first-class publication and one of the country's best state historical journals. In 2007, the Quarterly marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Little Rock crisis with numerous articles on civil rights and African-American history. This year's volume will see additional articles on these subjects but also studies of topics as varied as the early decades of the timber industry in Crossett, Native Americans' role in the drawing of Arkansas's western boundary, and congresswoman Effiegene Wingo, who was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives even before Hattie Caraway went to the Senate.

Exciting things are happening at a number of our state's historical sites and institutions.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

President's Report to the Membership, 2008
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.