Globalization & American Popular Culture

By Yost, Brian | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), June 2008 | Go to article overview

Globalization & American Popular Culture


Yost, Brian, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Globalization & American Popular Culture Lane Crothers. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc., 2007.

Lane Crothers provides a highly accessible introduction to basic concepts of cultural studies specifically as related to economic globalization. He begins with a brief examination of means of evaluating culture, moving from a broad anthropological/ideological perspective to the more specific notion of an American culture constructed through the distribution and consumption of popular media. Crothers then provides an overview of the technology and history of recorded media, which he identifies as the central component of both domestic and exported American popular culture. He then briefly discusses portrayals of American cultural values in each of these major categories and patterns of cultural resistance in Iran, France, Venezuela, and Hong Kong. Finally, Crothers predicts future roles of American popular culture.

Crothers examines American cultural values he argues are inherent in all popular culture products, which he claims manifest performances of civic duty, in three somewhat arbitrary cases for each major production area. Comprising this section are the films Titanic, The Patriot, and Blade Runner, TV series Star Trek, The West Wing, and Max Headroom; and musicians Britney Spears, Garth Brooks and Tupac Shakur. The purpose of this examination is to "offer a series of extended analyses of representative examples of American movies, music, and television programs that have been popular worldwide. Rather than just relying on the broad descriptions available in academic research, then, this section offers a detailed examination of the ideals, values, and themes contained within American popular culture" (73). This is a very ambitious claim, worthy of extended consideration, one Crothers attempts to speak on in as broad a context as possible. However, much of Crothers' research material comes from web sites including Wikipedia, answers.com and celebritywonder.com. While the Internet offers the potential for globalized commentary on popculture icons, Crothers' usage of web materials seems more an evasion of library research. For each media genre, he discusses the positive cultural values portrayed in his first two selections and the negative values of the third. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Globalization & American Popular Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.