The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves

By Moody, David L. | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), June 2008 | Go to article overview

The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves


Moody, David L., Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves Halifu Osumare. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

From the deejay to the emcee, the artistic expression of the graffiti artists, and the athleticism of skilled b-boy and b-girl breakers, The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves, is a powerful reflection of the diverse voices of the hip-hop nation from a global perspective. Once considered by critics to be just another passing youth trend, hip-hop has become an influential voice for youth around the globe. Halifu Osumare takes the reader on a cultural journey exploring key components of African artistic expression as they relate to global hip-hop. "Hip-hop culture," he writes, "has become international in breadth and depth, with thousands of cultures throughout the globe having embraced it in various forms ... Given the impact and pervasive confluence of global communications and postmodern chic, it should come as no surprise that hip-hop youth culture has proliferated internationally" (2, 21).

Within the construct of the "global-hood," Osumare examines how an expressive culture that began in the impoverished working-class black and Latino communities in New York has developed into a performative and social phenomenon that incorporates verbal skills and other creative elements such as dance and music. Central to Osumare's argument is the concept of an Africanist aesthetic, a term coined by dance scholar Brenda Gottschild and defined by Osumare as "a processual mode of Expressivity that privileges the negotiation of the self in the moment through a complex use of rhythmic timing, verbal or non verbal rhetorical strategies, and multiple layers of meaning that draw from its sociocutural context and audience" (12). Moreover, the African aesthetic continues to reflect the African performance practices of West and Central Africa thus creating a performative stage that allows for the exploration of cultural identity by the hip-hop artist.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.