Roll a Coin through the Curriculum: Unit 1: New France

Teach, May/June 2008 | Go to article overview

Roll a Coin through the Curriculum: Unit 1: New France


Introduction

Before Europeans ventured across the Atlantic Ocean, Canada was an unnamed, sparsely populated region inhabited by aboriginal tribes. It was a vast landscape waiting to be settled. The arrival of early French explorers and the founding of New France set off a chain of activities that led to the creation of Canada. The new country's unusual character was forged from an uneasy union between two European cultures that coexisted for centuries.

General Outcomes/Expectations

Students will:

* understand the conditions under which new settlers and new settlements existed;

* gain insight into the day-to-day existence of settlers;

* See how the economy functioned and what part currency played in the local economy;

* conduct research using tools such as the Internet;

* hone critical assessment and evaluation skills; and

* work together in teams to accomplish tasks.

Key Concepts and Issues

Students will explore how valuable and important economic activity was to the political and social existence in New France.

This resource was produced for the Royal Canadian Mint by TEACH Magazine. For more information about this educational program, please visit www.teachmag.com or email us at info@teachmag.com

"One of the Famous Old Totem Poles of the North." -nd.

Photo from http://library.usask.ca/ native/

Curriculum Links

Evaluation and Assessment

Rubric

see above documents posted at http://teachmag. com/teach_ mint.html

Activities

junior (grades 4-6), intermediate (grades 7-9), and senior (grades 10-12)

JUNIOR LEVEL ACTIVITY

New France: Currency in the New World

Duration

Two to three class periods

Equipment Required

pencils, markers, pens, paper, access to computers and the Internet

Outcomes / Expectations

Students will:

* gain insight into the history of New France;

* understand what it was like to live during that period;

* research New France's monetary system;

* create an effective presentation;

* develop critical thinking and analytical skills; and

* work together in teams.

Resources

www.histori.ca

www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com

www.cbc.ca

www.archives.ca

Introduction

Beginning with the founding of Quebec City in 1608, French settlements were established along the banks of the St. Lawrence River. Smaller communities, however, started earlier. Like any new enterprise, systems of government had to be set up from scratch. The lifeblood of any community is steeped in commerce and trade. And, although the barter system was in use for much of the trade that took place, hard currency was a neccessity. Merchants required payment for the goods they offered for sale. Members of the military who safeguarded early settlements needed to pay their troops with some form of currency.

For many of the early settlement years in New France, metal coins were a scarce commodity. These coins were transported from France. Once they were in circulation, a shortage developed. The settlements in New France were not capable or even allowed to produce their own currencies. Ships did sail back and forth to France, but did so infrequently. At times, the shortage of coins became so severe that an alternative was desperately needed. People who needed to be paid could not wait months, if not years, for ships to travel to France and back again.

The solution was both creative and innovative. In the absence of metal coins, playing cards were introduced as currency. Although a novel solution, the practice became widely accepted within the new colonies. When troops were to be paid, for example, senior officers would write the denomination on the back of the playing card, displaying its value. To the merchants and the general population in the settlements, the playing cards became accepted currency. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Roll a Coin through the Curriculum: Unit 1: New France
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.