STATES OF VIOLENCE: Politics, Youth, and Memory in Contemporary Africa

By Quinn, Joanna R. | International Journal, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

STATES OF VIOLENCE: Politics, Youth, and Memory in Contemporary Africa


Quinn, Joanna R., International Journal


STATES OF VIOLENCE Politics, Youth, and Memory in Contemporary Africa Edna G. Bay and Donald L. Donham, eds. Charlottesville and London: University of Virginia Press, 2006. 268 pp, US$49-50 cloth (ISBN 978-0-8139-2569-1).

This interdisciplinary examination of the social reconstruction of six African states (Guinea-Bissau, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Zimbabwe) after conflict explores the dynamics of violence. The essays provide a number of particularly insightful case studies that reveal the pivotal role that violence can and does play in tearing apart the long-standing social relationships that make up contemporary African society. These cases are both wide-ranging and critically engaged in an exploration of themes that are expanded and repeated throughout the book.

The volume describes a number of conflicts that have taken place on the continent of Africa since the late 19803. It outlines the grim reality of the outcome of the power struggles that took place in Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Zimbabwe, as well as the Rwandan genocide. These four cases are by now fairly well known. But it also details lesser-known community-level gang warfare in Nigeria, South Africa, and a microcosm of ethnic conflict in Guinea-Bissau. This combination of cases provides a rare qualitative treatment of the importance of conflict.

One of the most useful contributions of States of Violence is a discussion, by co-editor Donald L. Donham, of violence itself. He skilfully dissects common notions of violence as a structural inevitability. Particularly in Africa, where many believe that numerous cases of extreme violence result from a predisposition to aggression and brutality, Donham reveals how colonial intervention actually constructed, and then exacerbated, patterns of violence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

STATES OF VIOLENCE: Politics, Youth, and Memory in Contemporary Africa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.