Forthcoming Books and New Recordings

The Beethoven Newsletter, Winter 1986 | Go to article overview
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Forthcoming Books and New Recordings


Oxford University Press has announced the publication of William Kinderman's Beethoven 's Diabelli Variations: A Study of its Evolution and Significance in early 1987 (in the series "Studies in Musical Genesis and Structure" edited by Lewis Lockwood). Professor Kinderman's study of the compositional origins of Op. 120 is the first extended study of these sources, and concludes that the work was begun in 1819, laid aside for two years, and completed in 1822 and 1823. Beethoven's transformation, parodying, and transcendence of Diabelli's commonplace, if not banal, waltz, are explored by Kinderman, who also suggests that there is a fascinating series of historical allusions to other composers in the final variations.

Norton will publish William S. Newman's new study on the performance practices of Beethoven's piano music, wittily titled although this may not be the exact final version - "Playing Beethoven His Way - The Piano Music." The book addresses many important issues concerning performance practices with the impeccable scholarship and creative thinking we have come to expect from one of the deans of American Beethoven studies.

Cambridge University Press has just issued a very interesting title, Beethoven's Critics, by Robin Wallace. Dr. Wallace's dissertation, "Contemporaneous Criticism on Beethoven: Implications for Musical Analysis," (Ph.D., Music History, Yale University, 1984?), is the basis for the new publication. Scholars who have tried unsuccessfully to obtain a copy of the dissertation will be glad to be able to study Wallace's interpretation of the critical literature.

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