Cdid Ensures Soldiers Retain Dominance on Future Battlefields

By Sando, Don | Infantry, July/August 2008 | Go to article overview

Cdid Ensures Soldiers Retain Dominance on Future Battlefields


Sando, Don, Infantry


The mission of the Maneuver Center of Excellence (MCOE) is to provide the Nation with the world's best trained Infantry, Armor, and Cavalry Soldiers and adaptive leaders imbued with the Warrior Ethos; to provide a power projection platform capable of deploying and redeploying Soldiers, civilians, and units anywhere in the world on short notice; and to define capabilities for the Infantry and Armor to meet the needs of the future force. The Infantry and Armor Schools have a long tradition of training, preparing, and equipping our Soldiers to fight together and win. This culture of teamwork continues as we establish the MCOE.

The new organization within the MCOE primarily responsible for ensuring our Soldiers retain their dominance on all future battlefields is the Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate (CDID). Its mission is to develop operational and organizational concepts, requirements, and integrated capabilities across maneuver formations and into the joint, interagency, and multinational arena. CDID combines Armor, Cavalry, and Infantry capabilities development into a unified, effective team to support our Warfighters.

The director of CDID was recently selected and assumed duties in February 2008. With this move, both centers have taken another critical step toward the MCOE. CDID consists of several organizations responsible for overseeing conceptual development across the warfighting functions, developing and overseeing the fielding and sustainment of the Army's premier fighting vehicles and equipment, and providing the point of entry into the Generating Force for the brigade combat teams to address their issues and needs for the current fight and future requirements.

As early as Fiscal Year 2010, the CDID director will be supported by an integration staff who will assist in the development and transition of the organization. …

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