Virginia Nursing History

By Gibson, Mary E. Phd, Rn | Nursing History Review, January 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Virginia Nursing History


Gibson, Mary E. Phd, Rn, Nursing History Review


Virginia Nursing History. Special Collections and Archives, Tompkins-McCaw Library, Virginia Commonwealth University. Compiled by the Joint History Committee of the Virginia Nurses' Association and the Virginia League of 1Nursing. Archivist, Jodi Koste; Designer, Andrew Bain, Virginia Commonwealth University (http://www.library.vcu.edu/tml/speccoll/nursing/)

The main purpose of the Web site, Virginia Nursing History, is to provide a survey of the history of professional nursing and nursing education in Virginia, including information about nursing organizations, certifications, educational programs, and the accomplishments of selected nursing leaders. The opening page of the Web site orients the visitor to a short description of the site, with information provided about site maintenance, standards, and credits. The site is well organized and divided into seven topical sections, each centering on a particular theme or focus of Virginia nursing history. The first section, Highlights of Nursing in Virginia, contains a comprehensive timeline that begins in 1900 and lists important events in the history of Virginia nursing through 2003. Each of the timeline items is accompanied by a short explanation of the event with appropriate embedded links to other sections of the Web site. The Nursing Schools section provides maps identifying locations of various nursing programs, both current and defunct, and the years they existed. The educational programs are divided into Doctoral, Master's, Baccalaureate, Associate, Licensed Practical Nurse, and Diploma programs. Nursing Organizations, the subject of the third section, identifies 17 Virginia nursing organizations formed over the century beginning with ones organized in 1901. Information on each of the organizations includes summaries on the history of the group, links to past presidents, annual meetings, and if still in existence, a link to the current Web site of the organization. If the organization has merged or is no longer in existence, information is provided concerning that process. The Virginia Board of Nursing is the fourth category represented. It presents information concerning the origins of the Board as well as the various names the Board was known by since its establishment in 1903. Named in chronological order of appointment are all the Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, and citizen members of the Board. An additional category of this section names the chief officers of the Board from its initial inception. The last three sections of the Web site concentrate on the achievements of individual nurses. The Fellows of the Academy lists all Virginia nurses who were named Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing from 1974 to 2001. An Awards section lists Virginia winners of national awards in nursing. The final and a most helpful section for the nurse historian is the Virginia Nursing Hall of Fame. Fifteen nurses are featured with a short sketch of each along with a portrait, a linked biography, and bibliography for each nurse. The Joint History Committee of the Virginia Nurses Association (VNA) and the Virginia League for Nursing (VLN) developed the selection criteria used for featured nurses and selected the inaugural class of inductees in the spring of 2001. …

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