Modern Russian Theology: Bukharev, Soloviev, Bulgakov: Orthodox Theology in a New Key

By Robinson, Paul | Canadian Slavonic Papers, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Modern Russian Theology: Bukharev, Soloviev, Bulgakov: Orthodox Theology in a New Key


Robinson, Paul, Canadian Slavonic Papers


Paul Valliere. Modern Russian Theology: Bukharev, Soloviev, Bulgakov: Orthodox Theology in a New Key. Grand Rapids, Mich.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2000. x, 443 pp. Notes. Bibliography. Index. $42.00, cloth.

In the past ten years, long forgotten or repressed ideas have re-emerged in the area of theology, just as they have in all areas of Russian thought. The collapse of communism has given the Russian Orthodox Church a great opportunity to reform itself and review its thinking and traditions. But as Paul Valliere, McGregor Professor of Humanities at Butler University, argues, "reformers need landmarks." In Modern Russian Theology, Professor Valliere reveals the landmarks that he believes are most appropriate. He looks back to the "Russian School" of Orthodox theology, which lasted from the 1860s to the 1930s. As he points out, the proponents of the Russian School attempted to relate Orthodoxy to the problems of modern life. This effort marked a decisive shift from the older Patristic tradition of the Russian Church, but was short-lived, since by the mid-twentieth century, the Neopatristic school had come to dominate Russian theology. Professor Valliere argues that contemporary Russian thinkers who want the Church to speak about contemporary issues will not find much of value in the writing of the Neopatristic scholars and should instead turn to the Russian School. He reviews the writing of three members of the school-Alexander Bukharev (1824-71), Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900), and Sergei Bulgakov (1871-1944), chosen because in chronological terms they represent the beginning, middle, and end of the era of the Russian School.

The book is divided into three parts, each devoted to one of the three writers. Valliere gives some brief biographical details of the writers, but most of the book consists of a detailed analysis of their major works. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Modern Russian Theology: Bukharev, Soloviev, Bulgakov: Orthodox Theology in a New Key
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.