Baseball in Chicago

By McKinney, Gordon | Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Winter 2007 | Go to article overview

Baseball in Chicago


McKinney, Gordon, Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society


Black Baseball and Chicago: Essays on the Players, Teams and Games of the Negro Leagues'Most Important City. Edited by Leslie A. Heaphy. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Publishers, 2006. Pp. 267. Paper $29.95).

Burying the Black Sox: How Baseball's Cover-Up of the 1919 World Series Fix Almost Succeeded. By Gene Carney. (Washington: Potomac Books, Inc., 2006. Pp.360. Cloth $26.95).

Both of these useful books provide new information about the story of baseball in Chicago. In each case the broad outlines are known, but both volumes add many new details and interpretations. They testify to the dynamic role that baseball played in the city's identity in the years between 1900 and World War II. Although they will appeal to broad general audiences, these studies also are well documented and that will allow scholars to consult them with confidence.

Heaphy's fine book is part of an ongoing project of the Negro Leagues Committee of the Society for American Baseball Research. Specifically, several of the chapters are papers that were delivered at the 2005 Jerry Malloy Conference. The narrative begins with Black teams and players that made notable contributions before 1910. The second chapter provides a great deal of information about Andrew "Rube" Foster and the dominant Negro League team from Chicago-the Chicago American Giants. Following sections include brief biographies of significant African-American players and members of management. This series of short essays is undoubtedly the most valuable part of the book and will be a source for other scholars working in local or sport history. There are also brief discussions of the East-West AU Star games, parks where games were played, and rosters of Negro League teams. This organization of the volume is more like an encyclopedia than a single essay, but the author's choice of presentation probably allowed her to present information more efficiently than any other format.

Gene Carney's study, in contrast, is an essay with a specific interpretation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Baseball in Chicago
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.