The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/La Société Canadienne D'étude Du Dix-Huitième Siècle

By Rice, Paul F. | Canadian University Music Review, January 1, 1995 | Go to article overview

The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/La Société Canadienne D'étude Du Dix-Huitième Siècle


Rice, Paul F., Canadian University Music Review


Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

13-16 October 1994

The twentieth conference of this society was held at the Delta Bessborough hotel in Saskatoon from 13-16 October 1994, under the sponsorship of the University of Saskatchewan. The task of organizing this complex event was intrusted to the capable hands of Alex Sokalski (Conference President) and Peter Loptson (VicePrésident) who, along with a large team of able volunteers, oversaw the smooth running of four simultaneous sessions of papers. Delegates attended from France, Spain, Canada and the United States.

The theme of the conference was "Reason and Unreason/raîson et déraison". In addition to four plenary sessions, 102 individual papers were delivered, with topics that explored a wide range of interests in the social, political, artistic and scholarly pursuits of eighteenth-century life. The interdisciplinary nature of this society was reflected in sessions that ranged from the "History of Science" to "Gardens, Symbolic Space and Pope" and from "Pornography and Pornographers" to "The German Enlightenment". Four music papers presented aspects of eighteenth-century musical life within a socio-historical context: (1) J. Richard Raum (University of Regina) " 18th-Century Society and the Professional Musician: Thomas Geschladt, A case History," (2) Paul F. Rice (Memorial University of Newfoundland) "Power, Politics and the Production of Opera: Madame de Pompadour, Mondonville and Rameau," (3) Gordana Lazarevich (University of Victoria) "The Musical Libertine in Mozart's Vienna: How Art Reflected Life", and (4) Jack Eby (Bishop's University) "François Giroust and Félix Nogaret: Making Revolutionary Music in Versailles."

Live music made a welcome addition to the spoken word at the conference. Members of the University of Saskatchewan Wind Orchestra presented a spirited account of Mozart' s Serenade in B-flat major, KV 361 ("Grande Partïtta") under the direction of Marvin Eckroth (University of Saskatchewan) at the hotel. An evening concert was presented at the Anglican Cathedral of St.

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