Chicago Women's Musicians Club Reaches out to Southern Sisters

International Musician, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Chicago Women's Musicians Club Reaches out to Southern Sisters


Chicago and New Orleans both make important claims to the roots of American music: Chicago as home of the blues and New Orleans as the birthplace of jazz. The two cities are more than 900 miles apart, and in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the fate of musicians in the Crescent City has been much on the mind of Ruth Tobias of Local 10-208 (Chicago, IL).

Tobias organized the Women's Professional Musicians Club (WPMC) within the membership of Local 10-208 and recently undertook a goodwill mission to assist the members of a similar group in New Orleans. She's recorded her experiences in a series of columns for the local's Intermezzo newsletter, but there's still more that has remained untold.

In April 2007, Jennifer Silk of Local 10-208 informed WPMC members of a spring clean-out effort: cleaning out closets of performance clothes, boxing them up, and sending them to Local 174-496 (New Orleans, LA). "Our Local Vice President Terry Jares put me in touch with Local 174-496 member Cindy Mayes," Silk says. "Cindy had it in the back of her mind to start a club like ours, and our big box of goodies inspired her to get things happening."

In New Orleans, Mayes worked to organize New Orleans Women in Music (NOWM). "She's on top of where everyone is and how to get in touch with people in the music business," Tobias says. According to Tobias, the women's group responded with tremendous gratitude and made it the mission of their group to find work, find health, and find every good thing for musicians down there.

Tobias traveled to New Orleans in December 2007, meeting up with Mayes and her husband Frank, also a member of Local 174-496. "They were my eyes and ears and history buffs for all that goes on down in New Orleans," Tobias says. She witnessed the recovery efforts in the city, and took note especially of The Pink Project, organized by actor Brad Pitt, which seeks to rebuild homes destroyed by the hurricane with environmentally-friendly building materials.

Tobias also visited the New Orleans Musicians' Clinic, begun in 1998 and working with increased fervor since Hurricane Katrina, as well as the Musicians' Village, created by Habitat for Humanity. "I got so excited by all this, and I thought we don't hear a lot about it up north," Tobias says. "It's been two and a half years, for heaven's sake, and they're still struggling."

On a second trip to New Orleans in February 2008, Tobias met Banu Gibson, a board member of Local 174-4%. Through her involvement with the New Orleans Women in Music, Gibson was able to find Tobias housing while she stayed in New Orleans for a month spent in outreach and discovery. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Chicago Women's Musicians Club Reaches out to Southern Sisters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.