The Many Faces and Many Places of Nursing

By Lampe, Susan | Creative Nursing, October 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Many Faces and Many Places of Nursing


Lampe, Susan, Creative Nursing


"The many faces and many places of nursing-What does that mean to you?" I asked my friends this question when I first undertook the assignment as guest editor of this issue of Creative Nursing. It was a great way to start a conversation about my favorite subject: nursing. We talked about out-of-the-ordinary roles and locations. Nearly everyone had an excellent idea to share: nurse att orney, nurse legislator, missionary, parish nurse, hospice nurse, nurse midwife, nursing consultant, prison nurse, block nurse, school nurse.

How amazing! How wonderful! I used to tell my nursing students that nursing is a wonderful profession because no matt er what you like to do, you can do it as a nurse. It is true: The roles and locations for nurses are endless because health issues extend into all aspects of our lives and to all locations in the world.

The American Nurses Association reports that in 2004 more than 2.4 million registered nurses were employed in the United States, about one-fourth of them on a part-time basis. Slightly more than half were employed in hospitals, 14.9% in community/public health, 11.5% in ambulatory care, 6.3% in nursing homes, and 2.6% in education (American Nurses Association, 2008). These statistics may explain why the public image of nursing is so frequently limited to hospital or clinic nursing.

For this issue of Creative Nursing we have sought out nurses willing to share their stories about their work in more unusual places. All the authors share their individual passions for their work as nurses, yet there is a universal quality to all the stories because each reflects the values and ethics that are universal to the profession. In the Minnesota state legislature or in a village in F. i, as a volunteer in a long-term care facility in Minnesota or as a parish nurse in Peru, training birth att endants in Sudan or being a clinical examiner for nontraditional students, expanding nursing students?f world view with a trip to Turkey or providing group prenatal care, counseling sex offenders or practicing elder law, helping wounded soldiers in Iraq or troubled Latino youth in St. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Many Faces and Many Places of Nursing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.