Bottom Line On-Line

The Government Accountants Journal, Fall 1997 | Go to article overview
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Bottom Line On-Line


Federal Agencies Are Developing New One-Stop Web Site to Benefit State and Local Governments

More than 600 federal programs providing funds, services, assistance and information are administered by state and local governments. Suppose a city planner wanted to find out the latest federal programs that affect the environment? Even surfing the web, it wouldn't be easy to locate all the environmental impact programs underway atthe U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency and others.

Help is on the way. Thirteen federal agencies are collaborating to establish a one-stop web site to facilitate state and local government access to federal information. The National Performance Review (NPR) and the Government Information Technology Services Board's Intergovernmental Enterprise Panel are cosponsors.

Beverly Godwin, who heads NPR's interagency activities and chairs the intergovernmental team, believes the new web site, the US. State and Local Gateway, will provide the answer by cutting across all federal agency resources and arraying the information by topic (such as economic development, education or disaster relief). This should offer a more efficient way for states and localities to obtain information.

Feedback from Customers

The federal team is consulting with potential state and local customers and wants to hear from both front-line workers and officials during the initial phase of the web site design. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency held a focus group with state and local employees to learn about their information needs. The National Association of Counties,the National League of Cities and the International City/County Management Association are also helping to solicit feedback. These organizations, through their own newsletters, web sites and Internet e-mail,will announce the project and receive support from their membership.

Other Federal Agencies Can Participate

The following agencies form part of the federal team: the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education, Health and Human Service, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Transportation and Treasury; the Environmental Protection Agency; the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Office of Management and Budget

Godwin invites other federal agencies involved with state and local governments to join the effort If your agency has funding, information or regulations that affect states and localities, please contact Nancy Singer at NPR at (202)632-0174 or via E-mail at nancy.singer(npr.gsa.gov. Singer will direct to you to the appropriate issue leader.

Online Tool Launched for Administering Federal Grants, Complying with New Single Audit Requirements

An authoritative new web application that guides federal grant recipients and their auditors in complying with a plethora of program compliance rules and new audit requirements has been launched by Thompson Publishing Group.

For each of more than 1,000 federal assistance programs,the Online Guide to Federal Program Compliance and Audits lists all of the allowable and unallowable activities, eligibility requirements, special reporting rules and matching, level-of-effort and earmarking requirements that states, local governments, universities and nonprofit organizations need to ensure federal program compliance.

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