Analysis of the Statement, Part 1

By Sumpter, J. L. | Law & Order, November 2008 | Go to article overview

Analysis of the Statement, Part 1


Sumpter, J. L., Law & Order


Why did the suspect say THAT word or use THAT sentence during the answer? Better yet, what did the suspect NOT say? Word use is directly tied to emotions surrounding the answers. A question that crests the surface of deception may force the suspect to use words or phrases in an attempt to cover up the truth. The use of statement analysis is an effective tool to detect these behaviors.

Statement analysis is an excellent tactic when used properly. Officers must first determine the suspect's normal language. This is done by asking questions that will result in a truthful statement. Aside from questions relating to their personal lives, it is better to ask a question closely related to the case knowing the answer will be truthful.

People tend to speak differently when there is very little stress tied to the conversation. By asking questions related to the case, the officer is putting the suspect as close to the topic as possible without the possibility of deception. This gives the officer a more accurate depiction of the suspect's language.

As the officer creates a mental note of normal communication, he will begin dissecting the topic by asking specific open questions. As the suspect answers, the officer should be asking himself some questions. Has the suspect's use of pronouns changed? Has the length of the answers changed? Are there more speech errors during stress questioning?

Pay attention if during initial questioning the suspect commits himself to the answer by using "I" but lacks it during stress questioning. There is a reason why the suspect is attempting to distance himself from the answer. The officer must pay close attention to the sentence or the area of the answer where "I" disappears. For example, "I thought she was there when I came home. I had a sandwich. Went to the store. And then we came back home." In this example, the time from making a sandwich and going to the store needs further exploring.

The use of "I" is more indicative of honesty, but when left out of a particular area, it may be done intentionally. The suspect owns a portion of the answer (truth) but lacks ownership when emotions take over. When observing for the use of "I," pay particular attention if the suspect substitutes it with "we." Why has the suspect chosen to use "we" and not completely own the answer? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Analysis of the Statement, Part 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.