The Church of England in North Carolina: Documents, 1742-1763

By Gundersen, Joan R. | Anglican and Episcopal History, December 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

The Church of England in North Carolina: Documents, 1742-1763


Gundersen, Joan R., Anglican and Episcopal History


The Church of England in North Carolina: Documents, 1742-1763. Edited by Robert J. Cain and Jan-Michael Poff. (Raleigh: Division of Archives and History, The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, 2007, Pp. lxvi, 643. $55.00.)

The North Carolina Colonial Records Project's latest volume on the Anglican Church carries the documentary record forward from 1742 to 1763. During the two decades covered by this volume, the church in North Carolina moved from having the most tenuous of presences to a more substantial one, although with foundations still more on sand than rock.

Growing from two beleaguered missionaries to approximately seven clergy, each with a home base including a slightly more secure salary, glebe allowance, and actual church buildings, the church was still spread too thinly to meet all the spiritual and religious needs of the colony. Clergy traveled a daunting number of miles each year. In 1751, for example, Clement Hall reported covering 557 miles in 36 days during which he preached 25 sermons, churched 146 women, served communion to 248, and baptized 556 people.

The clergy letters, official reports, summaries of Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (S.P.G.) meetings, and the minutes from the two surviving vestry books from the period, together illustrate the difficulty the S.P.G. had in overseeing missionaries on the other side of the Atlantic. The society struggled to separate gossip from fact; letters went astray; missionaries gave up waiting for permission to move or take a leave. The S.P.G. seemed unable to grasp the actual conditions in North Carolina. Thus they pursued plans for a school for slave children in a parish where the priest suggested a school for white children might be needed more.

Although the editors were unimpressed with efforts to evangelize slaves, every missionary report includes baptisms of black adults and children.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

The Church of England in North Carolina: Documents, 1742-1763
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?