Supreme Court Law Clerks' Recollections of October Term 1951, Including the Steel Seizure Cases*

By Hileman, Charles C.; Mikva, Abner J. et al. | St. John's Law Review, Fall 2008 | Go to article overview

Supreme Court Law Clerks' Recollections of October Term 1951, Including the Steel Seizure Cases*


Hileman, Charles C., Mikva, Abner J., Paul, James C. N., Rutledge, Neal P., Small, Marshall L., Rehnquist, William H., Peterson, Gregory L., Barrett, John Q., Gormley, Ken, St. John's Law Review


INTRODUCTIONS

GREGORY L. PETERSON[dagger]

Welcome. The Robert H. Jackson Center exists to preserve and advance the legacy of Justice Jackson through education, events and exhibitry. Today's special roundtable discussion of the Supreme Court's October Term 1951 is made possible through the generosity of Chautauqua Institution, the Supreme Court Historical Society, the Robert H. Jackson Center and Chautauqua County, and we thank them. I am pleased to introduce Professor John Barrett, who will be moderating the first session.

* These proceedings, cosponsored by the Robert H. Jackson Center and the Supreme Court Historical Society, occurred in the Elizabeth S. Lenna Hall, Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua, New York, on May 16, 2007. They have been edited for publication.

[dagger] Partner, Phillips Lytle LLP and Chair of the Board of Directors, Robert H. Jackson Center, Inc., Jamestown, New York.

JOHN Q. BARRETT[double dagger]

Welcome to Chautauqua Institution. Our panel brings together five lawyers who fifty-five years ago served as law clerks to Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. My comoderator is Professor Ken Gormley of Duquesne University School of Law. Our format will be two segments. In the first, we will discuss the Justices and some of the cases of that Supreme Court Term. In the second segment, which Ken will moderate, we will discuss the Steel Seizure Cases,1 which came to the Supreme Court in the spring of 1952.

Our honored guests and panelists are five lawyers who have led high-achieving, diverse and public-spirited lives:

Charles C. Hileman was born in 1924 in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. After completing one year at Allegheny College, he entered the Army in July 1943. After six months in the Army Specialized Training Program, he joined the 75th Infantry Division, where he served until his discharge in December 1945. He was a Staff Sergeant Squad Leader in the European Theater from October 1944 until VE Day in May 1945, serving in the Battle of the Bulge, receiving the Combat Infantry Badge, a Bronze Star and three battle stars. In January 1946, he returned to Allegheny College. He was active in sports, was elected by the lettermen as Outstanding Athlete of 1947, earned his B.A. degree that year and later was named to Allegheny's Athletic Hall of Fame. Mr. Hileman received his J.D. degree from The Law School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1950, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. He was the law clerk for Judge Herbert F. Goodrich at the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit during 1950-51 and then a law clerk for Supreme Court Justice Harold H. Burton during the Court's October Term 1951. In June 1952, Mr. Hileman joined the Philadelphia law firm of Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis, which then, at twenty-five lawyers, was one of the city's largest law firms. By the time of his retirement on January 1, 1994, the firm had grown to more than 250 attorneys. He was a litigator throughout his career. Among his more interesting experiences was being part of the trial team that defended Philadelphia Communists in a criminal prosecution under the Smith Act in 1952 and 1953. Mr. Hileman was administrative chairman of Schnader's Litigation Department for eight years and chairman for eight years. He was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers, chaired its Ethics Committee for two years, was very active in the Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Bar Associations, and served for eight years as an Allegheny College trustee.

Abner J. Mikva was born in 1926 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. As an undergraduate, he attended the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Washington University in St. Louis. In 1944, he joined the United States Army Air Corps, where he was a 2nd Lieutenant and navigator and served until November 1945. He received his law degree from the University of Chicago, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the University of Chicago Law Review, in 1951, and he was a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Sherman Minton during the Court's October Term 1951. …

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