Strategies for Independent Learning

By Paciello, Linda K. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, September 2008 | Go to article overview
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Strategies for Independent Learning


Paciello, Linda K., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Strategies for Independent Learning FOSTERING INDEPENDENT LEARNING: Practical Strategies to Promote Student Success By V. S. Harvey & L. A. Chickie-Wolfe The Guilford Press, 2007

REVIEW BY LINDA K. PACIELLO

In this book, Harvey and Chickie-Wolfe aim to address the "underlying psychological factors that influence They provide detailed strategies empower students to self-regulate in eral areas including motivation to and learn, emotional reactions to behavior, time management and tion, cognition, metacognition, functions, academic abilities, and how successfully take tests. The book includes extensive checklists, and handouts that have been created teach and facilitate this

There is no question that weak dents have underdeveloped skills in selfregulation and time manage- ment. Often, resource room teachers work with students for several years specifically on these skills. Indeed, the resource room setting would most likely be the best place to implement a program of this type because the program calls for a high level of cognitive ing that may require a special teacher who has a good understanding the needs of the child and the ability teach the metacognitive skills necessary, The checklists would provide very valu- able information in this process. Response to intervention committees could chose specific empowering strategies from the different skill areas to remediate the weak skills of a student.

The down side of the program is that it requires a significant time commitment from students, families, and teachers. Many weak students have families who may not place a high value on school, or do not have the time to help their children, or do not have the level of education necessary to provide the vital help required.

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