Why the World Is Getting Warmer, Even Though It Is Getting Colder

By Ferrara, Peter | The American Spectator, March 2009 | Go to article overview

Why the World Is Getting Warmer, Even Though It Is Getting Colder


Ferrara, Peter, The American Spectator


THE SCIENCE DOES NOT SUPPORT global warming. The data does not support global warming. Increasingly around the world, the voting public does not support global warming regulation, seeing no justification for throwing taxpayer money at a nonexistent problem.

The sharp temperature declines of 2008 have been disastrous for those determined to take over the world on the excuse of man-made global warming. Despite what these liars tell you, the tide of scientific opinion is now turning against the idea that mankind is making a significant contribution to changes in global temperature.

But for the people who rabidly embrace the doctrine of human-caused global warming, none of this matters. For them global warming was never really about science or data. It is about power. Man-made global warming is a powerful justification for a massive expansion of government controls over human activities. That is why the ruling classes, from Al Gore to the editorial writers at the New York Times, who know nothing about science, so heartily embrace it. The United Nations sees global warming as the ticket to attaining the power of a world government. That is why the UN doctors the reports of its science panels.

But what this massive increase in government power would mean is a dramatic loss of freedom and prosperity for average working people theworld over. Global warming regulation, in fact, would involve a massive assault on the standard of living of the middle class, particularly in America. That is why this battle is so important.

THE TEMPERATURE RECORD

THE THEORY OF GLOBAL WARMING is that humancreated emissions of carbon dioxide (C02) cause that gas to build up in the atmosphere, trapping more heat from the sun as if in a greenhouse, which could drive global temperatures to potentially catastrophic levels. Humans cause C02 emissions primarily by burning fossil fuels like oil, coal, natural gas, and wood, which was the foundation of the Industrial Revolution. Emissions of other "greenhouse gases" can contribute to this as well.

For global warming to exist, global temperatures have to be increasing. Christopher Monckton, a policy adviser to former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, accurately summarizes the recent temperature record in saying, "Global warming stopped 10 years ago. It hasn't gotten warmer since 1998....In fact in the last seven years, there has been a downturn in global temperatures equivalent on average to about...one degree Fahrenheit per decade. We're actually in a period...of global cooling." Indeed, 2008 was the coldest year of the decade, continuing the cooling trend.

Surface temperatures in the U.S. were warmer in the 1930s. From 1940 to the late 1970s, U.S. temperatures declined, despite all the increased burning of fossil fuels during that period, leaving no significant difference at that point from 1900. This decline is what prompted speculation at the time that a new ice age was coming. Temperatures then increased until about 1998, sponsoring the global warming hysteria power grab. If recent temperature declines continue, all the increases since 1900 will soon be offset.

But far more reliable and relevant is the satellite data on atmospheric temperatures, which is not distorted by the location, coverage, and surrounding activities of land-based weather stations (highly unreliable outside the U.S. and Europe). The satellite data starts in 1979 and shows no increase in global temperature trends until 1998, when the El Niño that year caused a sharp temperature spike. The most recent temperature declines have now apparently completely offset that 1998 increase, leaving the satellite record with no net increase in global temperature for the past 30 years- or maybe even a slight decline.

Global temperatures were also warmer than today during the Medieval Warm Period, a period of several hundred years around 1000 AD. Even higher temperatures prevailed during a period known as the Holocene Climate Optimum, which ran roughly from 8,000 years ago (6000 BC) to 4,000 years ago (2000 BC).

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