Latest Research

Medical Economics, February 6, 2009 | Go to article overview

Latest Research


A summary of current clinical articles from that pile on your desk

FAMILY/INTERNAL MEDICINE

Higher Breast Cancer Risk from Hormone Therapy

Obstet Gynecol 2009;113:65-73. [January 2009]

Obstet Gynecol. 2009;113:74-80. [January 2009]

Long-term use of certain types of hormonereplacement therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, according to two studies. Finnish researchers found that women using E2-progestogen therapy after three years had an increased risk of breast cancer. In the second study, researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine in Lexington, Massachusetts, found that although women using estrogen alone or esterifted estrogen with methyltestosterone were at no more risk of breast cancer than non-users, women who used conjugated estrogen, combined with progestin, were at higher risk than non-users-particularly those who were on hormonereplacement therapy for four or more years, which about tripled the risk compared with non-users.

* Garlic Has Minimal Cancer-Prevention Effects

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:257-264. [January 2009]

Evidence suggests that garlic consumption has little or no effect in reducing the risk of many common cancers, South Korean researchers concluded. After conducting a review of 19 studies, the researchers found very limited evidence to support a link between garlic consumption and a reduced risk of colon, prostate, esophageal, larynx, oral, ovary, or renal cell cancers. They found no credible evidence to support a link between garlic consumption and a reduced risk of gastric, breast, lung, or endometrial cancer. * Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Risks Identified

Neurology. 2009;72:69-72. [January 6, 2009]

Smoking and a family history of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are independently associated with an increased risk of the illness, according to researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Compared with current non-smokers with no family history of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, the researchers found that current non-smokers with a family history, current smokers with no family history, and current smokers with a family history had a steadily increased risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

* Cognitive Rehab Shows Some Benefit in Brain Injury

Neuropsychology. 2009;23:20-39. [January 2009]

Cognitive rehabilitation appears to have a modest effect in individuals with acquired brain injury, according to researchers at the University of South Alabama in Mobile. The authors found relatively modest, yet significant, effects from cognitive rehabilitation on global cognitive function. Treatment effects were moderated by the treatment domain, type of injury, time since the injury, and age. Attention training appeared to be effective after traumatic brain injury, as did language and visuospatial training for aphasia and neglect syndromes following stroke.

* Health-Care-Associated Cases Have More Severe Pneumonia

Ann Intern Med. 2009;150:19-26. [January 6, 2009]

Italian researchers found that patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia had more severe disease and higher mortality than those with community-acquired pneumonia. Those with health-care-associated disease had higher fatality rates (17.8 percent vs. 6.7 percent) and longer average hospital stays (18.7 days vs. 14.7 days) than patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

* Hundreds Acquired Hepatitis B, C in U.S. Health-Care Settings

Ann Intern Med. 2009;150:33-39. [January 6, 2009]

More than 400 people in the United States were found to have acquired the hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus in non-hospital, health-care settings since 1998, with more than 60,000 estimated to have been at risk during these outbreaks, according to investigators at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The investigators identified 33 outbreaks: 18 resulted in 173 cases of HBV infection, 16 resulted in 275 cases of HCV infection, and 1 outbreak involved both. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Latest Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.