Demand and Supply

By Wesbury, Brian | The American Spectator, April 2009 | Go to article overview

Demand and Supply


Wesbury, Brian, The American Spectator


THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF ECONOMISTS- make that two types of people- in the world: demand-siders and supply-siders. What's interesting about the two is that they think in vastly different ways about life and human interaction.

This is not a bumper-sticker difference in ideology. Supply-siders do not walk around saying, "Cut taxes and watch prosperity trickle down." And demand-siders do not defend government spending no matter what. They could say these things, but their differences are much bigger and deeper than this.

Demand-siders tend to be pessimistic, fret about greed, worry about leaving people behind, see everything as win-lose, and worry about running out of resources. They believe government can fix all of these issues. Supply-siders tend to be optimistic, get excited about others' achievements, have faith that people can succeed, and believe things can always get better. They believe government often impedes success.

Some of these thought patterns have been subtly shaped by the ideas of dead economists and philosophers. But much of the difference in these two types of people derives from human nature. For example, it doesn't take an intellectual to stir up fear about running out of resources. It's a normal human worry. It's another matter, however, when economists and politicians take these ideas and extrapolate them into all kinds of economic theories and government policies.

In fact, the economic policy-maker-in-chief, President Barack Obama, and his economic team are clearly demand-siders. They talk of catastrophe, and running out of energy or clean air. And they claim that the only way to save the U.S. economy is for the government to spend money, because the people who earn it either can't or won't. This is a demand-side response, and is famously tied to John Maynard Keynes.

Demand-siders look at the world as if it were one giant treadmill of materialism. No wonder they are often so glum. If people stop spending, if people hold back, then the economy is in trouble. It's all about buying things, getting things, having things.

This is where our nation's church pastors enter the fray. They often complain about capitalism because it supposedly encourages people to take their eyes off God and keep them on material things. And if you believe in the demand-side view of the world, it's easy to believe that materialism makes the world go round.

What's interesting here is that no matter how much people complain about materialism and greed, when the economy gets in trouble, the first thing demand-siders want to do is stimulate demand. And in order to do this, they take resources from one group and increase government spending or turn right around and give that money to someone they think will spend it.

If people are buying fewer houses, the government thinks lowering the prices by forcing banks to lower the amount owed or to lower mortgage rates will boost economic activity. But as Milton Friedman said, "There is no such thing as a free lunch." If we need government to move in with all guns blazing to artificially lower mortgage rates, then someone will pay. Mortgage holders may pay less today, but the lenders will pay a price in the future.

While demand-siders think that stimulating demand by taking from one group and giving to another group is a wise policy, they paradoxically also have a zero-sum view of the world. They think that when the rich get richer, the poor get poorer, but also think that taxing the rich more makes everyone better off. They don't believe that when the poor get richer, the rich get poorer.

President Obama's economic team assumes raising taxes will do nothing to the overall wealth of the land because it's all one big pot that needs to be stirred. Some of President Obama's advisers even believe that redistributing wealth will accelerate economic activity because lower-income people spend more of their income. And since spending (demand) makes the world go round, we will all be better off if we spend more in total. …

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