Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ

By Blomberg, Craig L. | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 2009 | Go to article overview

New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ


Blomberg, Craig L., Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ. By Thomas R. Schreiner. Grand Rapids: Baker, 2008, 990 pp., $44.99.

A flurry of large, helpful NT theologies has appeared in just the last few years (e.g. Matera, Strecker, Schnelle), including several by evangelicals (Marshall, Thielman, Helyer). Tom Schreiner has now joined the project, with a distinctive arrangement of material that is part biblical and part thematic. Eschewing the approach of Guthrie in 1980 who began with all of the standard categories of systematic theology and then looked at each NT author's or book's contribution, as well as the more recent prevailing approach that seeks to hear the distinctive voice of each separate book, Schreiner creates categories that resemble key systematic topics and follow conventional sequence but also that, he believes, emerge more directly from pervasive themes that unify the NT. Then he looks at one or more books' dominant and distinctive contribution to those topics, author by author or corpus by corpus. Schreiner is convinced that this approach is needed in order to counter the reigning liberal practice of pitting one part of the Bible against another and to demonstrate the overarching unity of the various documents.

The first sentence of the introduction discloses the book's thesis. The unity of the NT involves seeing its "God-focused, Christ-centered, and Sprit-saturated" nature, "but the work of the Father, Son, and Spirit must be understood along a salvation-historical timeline; that is, God's promises are already fulfilled but not yet consummated in Christ Jesus" (p. 23). Schreiner then sketches the main ways in which this is prepared for by OT background and then appears in the Synoptic Gospels, the Johannine literature, Acts, Paul, Hebrews and James, 1-2 Peter and Jude, and Revelation. As the book unfolds, depending on the importance and detail of a given topic in a given part of the NT, he may treat each Gospel separately, put Matthew and Mark or Luke-Acts together, and subdivide the Johannine literature and the other non-Pauline epistles further.

Overall, the volume falls into four main parts. First comes "The Fulfillment of God's Saving Promises: The Already-Not Yet," subdivided into chapters on the kingdom of God in the Synoptics, eternal life and eschatology in John, and inaugurated eschatology outside the Gospels. Part 2 is the longest, on "The God of the Promise: The Saving Work of the Father, Son, and Spirit," with ten chapters, the first and last of which treat, respectively, (Jod the Father and the Spirit in the entire NT. In between, eight chapters look at various aspects of the person and work of Christ categorized either according to christological titles, a particular corpus, or a main constituent element of Christology. The final two parts ("Experiencing the Promise: Believing and Obeying" and "The People of the Promise and the Future of the Promise") again contain only three chapters each and are divided exclusively topically.

Schreiner explains that he wrote the first three drafts of the book (!) without explicit reference to secondary literature, though obviously he draws on a distinguished publishing career in which he has become intimately familiar with much of that literature. Only afterwards did he go back and insert documentation and interaction with scholars, mostly in the footnotes. The text clearly discloses the fruit of this method. The wording is clear, discussions succinct, and biblical references compendious. On countless occasions one becomes aware of exegetical alternatives that Schreiner could have discussed only if he wanted to double the length of an already massive tome. While one usually gets at least some sense of why he has chosen the positions he has, even then there are occasions when one finds mere assertion rather than argumentation.

On main issue after main issue and on the vast majority of the more minor topics, I find myself in full agreement with Schreiner's exegesis and synthesis.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.