How Do German Companies Run Their Cost Accounting Systems?

By Friedl, Gunther; Hammer, Carola et al. | Management Accounting Quarterly, Winter 2009 | Go to article overview

How Do German Companies Run Their Cost Accounting Systems?


Friedl, Gunther, Hammer, Carola, Pedell, Burkhard, Küpper, Hans-Ulrich, Management Accounting Quarterly


COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS IN GERMAN COMPANIES PROVIDE A HIGH LEVEL OF DETAIL FOR MANAGERS, FOCUS ON COST CENTERS AND COST CENTER ACCOUNTING, AND SEPARATE COSTS INTO FIXED AND VARIABLE COMPONENTS FOR EASY ANALYSIS OF PROFITS.

There is an ongoing debate in the United States about the performance of cost accounting systems. American managers tend to be dissatisfied with their own cost accounting methods, and there is widespread use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) IT systems based on German management accounting methods, so German cost accounting attracts a great deal of attention in the United States.1 Some American managers believe that German companies provide bestpractice examples because they are generally more satisfied with their systems.2 (See Figure 1 for results from two surveys.) To provide a basis for comparison, we studied the cost accounting systems of a number of the largest German enterprises.

Starting with an overview of the differences between German and U.S. accounting practices, we first provide some insights into German management accounting practices. Then we report the results of a survey that sheds light on the cost accounting practices of large German companies. Finally, we consider factors that will impact the future of cost accounting in German companies. The results of this study indicate a surprisingly high level of satisfaction among German managers with the information they derive from their cost accounting methods. Another significant finding of our survey is that German cost accounting systems regularly distinguish between variable and fixed costs and are more detailed than their U.S. counterparts.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN GERMAN AND AMERICAN COST ACCOUNTING PRACTICES

Cost accounting in the United States has regularly been criticized for not supporting managerial decision making and for inaccurate cost allocation resulting from widespread practice of allocating overhead costs based on direct labor.3 Recent empirical studies of cost accounting practices in the United States have shown that direct labor costs are commonly used to establish the overhead rate base.4 This result is surprising because activity-based costing (ABC) was designed to avoid this error.5 U.S. firms, however, have been reluctant to implement ABC. Kip Krumwiede's 1998 study of the implementation stages of activity-based costing reported that only a quarter of responding enterprises applied it.6 By 2005, Jeff Thomson and Jim Gurowka found that the system was already being described as "yesterday's hope."7

In Germany, however, several detailed management accounting systems were developed over the last century to overcome the flaws of external accounting.8 Because German financial accounting principles are designed to serve the purposes of creditors rather than investors, financial accounting cannot provide enough information for managerial decision making. Therefore, specific cost accounting systems have been designed for this purpose. The importance of cost accounting in Germany as a basic system for the supply, storage, and provision of corporate data led to the development of sophisticated cost accounting systems that combined the ability to effectively support managerial decision making and efficient IT support. With its strong theoretical foundation developed by Hans-Georg Plaut and Wolfgang Kilger, Germany's most important cost accounting system, Grenzplankostenrechnung (GPK), has reached great practical relevance-for instance, as embedded in software products like SAP, which supply data in consolidated or segmented form to corporate management as well as to decision makers on the plant floor.

The main features of GPK include cost-type accounting, cost center accounting, product cost accounting, and contribution margin accounting. One of the distinctive features is the separation of fixed and variable costs at the level of cost-type accounting. Because GPK follows the principles of direct costing, only variable costs are allocated to cost units. …

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