Vendor Compliance with Ontario's Tobacco Point of Sale Legislation

By Dubray, Jolene M.; Schwartz, Robert M. et al. | Canadian Journal of Public Health, March/April 2009 | Go to article overview

Vendor Compliance with Ontario's Tobacco Point of Sale Legislation


Dubray, Jolene M., Schwartz, Robert M., Garcia, John M., Bondy, Susan J., Victor, J. Charles, Canadian Journal of Public Health


ABSTRACT

Objective: On May 31, 2006, Ontario joined a small group of international jurisdictions to implement legislative restrictions on tobacco point of sale promotions. This study compares the presence of point of sale promotions in the retail tobacco environment from three surveys: one prior to and two following implementation of the legislation.

Method: Approximately 1,575 tobacco vendors were randomly selected for each survey. Each regionally-stratified sample included equal numbers of tobacco vendors categorized into four trade classes: chain convenience, independent convenience and discount, gas stations, and grocery. Data regarding the six restricted point of sale promotions were collected using standardized protocols and inspection forms. Weighted estimates and 95% confidence intervals were produced at the provincial, regional and vendor trade class level using the bootstrap method for estimating variance.

Results: At baseline, the proportion of tobacco vendors who did not engage in each of the six restricted point of sale promotions ranged from 41% to 88%. Within four months following implementation of the legislation, compliance with each of the six restricted point of sale promotions exceeded 95%. Similar levels of compliance were observed one year later. Grocery stores had the fewest point of sale promotions displayed at baseline. Compliance rates did not differ across vendor trade classes at either follow-up survey. Point of sale promotions did not differ across regions in any of the three surveys.

Conclusion: Within a short period of time, a high level of compliance with six restricted point of sale promotions was achieved.

Key words: Tobacco; marketing; compliance

La traduction du résumé se trouve à la fin de l'article. Can J Public Health 2009;100(2):109-12.

Mots clés : tabac; commercialisation; conformité

Point of sale promotion of tobacco products constitutes an important pillar in tobacco industry marketing efforts. Severe restrictions on other forms of public advertising for tobacco products increase the importance of in-store promotions. Aggressive point of sale advertising includes power walls (i.e., cigarette displays that exhibit cigarette brand associated colours, threedimensional displays and promotional lighting), countertop displays and signs advertising tobacco products. In 2006, the tobacco industry spent $107 million on point of sale promotions in Canada, including $40 million in Ontario alone.1 A study conducted in California estimated that, on average, there were 17.2 cigarette advertisements and promotional materials in each of the surveyed tobacco vendors.2 Moreover, significantly more cigarette marketing has been observed in retail environments where adolescents frequently shop, particularly for cigarette brands that are popular among adolescents,3 and in stores within 1000 feet of a school.4

A number of recent studies address the effects of retail cigarette advertising on youth. Cigarette advertisements at point of sale have been shown to increase brand user imagery in a positive direction among adolescents.5 Another study found that the prominence of cigarettes at point of sale increased adolescents' perceptions about the ease of illegally purchasing cigarettes, while the combined presence of cigarettes and advertising at point of sale decreased their perception of being asked for proof of age.6 Frequent exposure to retail cigarette marketing has been found to significantly increase the odds of smoking susceptibility7 and ever smoking among adolescents. 7,8 Furthermore, cigarette promotions have been associated with influencing youth who were already experimenting with cigarettes to progress to regular smoking, and established smokers being most influenced by promotional offers.9

Despite the apparent detrimental effects of point of sale promotions in promoting cigarette smoking, few jurisdictions have implemented legislation that bans or restricts tobacco point of sale promotions.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vendor Compliance with Ontario's Tobacco Point of Sale Legislation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.