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The Trees in My Forest

By Bernd Heinrich (HarperCollins Publishers, 1997, $24, illus.) Biologist Heinrich has written a biography of the forest near his home in Maine. A frequent contributor to Natural History, he admits he has been "partly arboreal since the age of eight." Love of his subject infuses the author's scientific discussion of the forest, its individual trees, and their avian, lichen, and fungal cohorts. His sixty-five pencil sketches complement the text.

The Return of the Wolf to Yellowstone By Thomas McNamee (Henry Holt and Company, 1997, $27.50)

Before gray wolves were driven to the brink of extinction, they were top predators in Greater Yellowstone, an eighteen-million-acre area that is considered the largest intact temperate ecosystem on Earth. Since 1994, conservationist and rancher McNamee (who has written about Italian wolves for Natural History) has kept a journal that, among other things, provides an insider's view of the stormy events that culminated in the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone.

Traces of the Past By Joseph B. Lambert (Addison Wesley Longman, 1997, $27.50, illus.)

Where did the bluestones of Stonehenge come from? Did lead poisoning hasten the decline of the Roman Empire? When did our human species populate the globe? Lambert, a professor of chemistry at Northwestern University, describes how such techniques as ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy gas chromatography, and DNA analysis are solving archeological mysteries. …

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