Steven Feifer Is School Psychologist of the Year

By O'Brien, Karen | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, May 2009 | Go to article overview

Steven Feifer Is School Psychologist of the Year


O'Brien, Karen, National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


The Awards Committee is pleased to announce that Steven Feifer, EdD, NGSP, ABSNP, is the 2009 School Psychologist of the Year. Dr. Feifer is a practicing school psychologist in Middletown, MD, providing services to three schools. He advocates for students by working collaboratively with parents and the school problem-solving team. Steve makes a point to develop parent relationships when a concern is initially voiced in order to develop trust and provide parents with learning activities to implement at home. He provides group and individual counseling services and helps develop functional behavior plans with school personnel for at-risk students.

At the district level, Steve has worked on the math curriculum committee to develop evidence-based math interventions, as well as on the RTI and ADHD committees to develop district-wide procedures. Dr. Feifer is frequently asked to provide professional development training to school personnel and he often volunteers to present workshops to parent groups.

Dr. Feifer became interested in school neuropsychology early in his career during a triennial révaluation of a nonverbal, nonambulatory fifth grader who had been identified previously as severely retarded but who the child's teacher indicated was reading at a fifth grade level. Steve's assessment con- firmed the teacher's observations and he worked with the IEP team to modify the student's educational program and placement so the student could receive his language arts instruction in the regular classroom. This child was then able to demonstrate his reading and spelling strengths. A few years after this experience, Steve completed postgradu- ate training in school neuropsychology in 1997 and then earned his doctorate in 2006 in school psychology. He is a strong advocate for using a process-oriented approach to assessment based on brain-behavior relationships.

In addition to the daily services Steve provides to students, families, and schools, he is a well-known and sought-after presenter in the area of school neu- ropsychology. He serves as the chief school neu- ropsychologist consul- tant for his county school system and has written several books and articles on various academic disorders. His first book, The Neuropsychology of Reading Disorders: Diagnosis and Intervention, was honored in 2001 by the NASP Neuropsychology Interest Group as the "Neuropsychology Publication of the Year.

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