Selecting Manuscripts for Publication in School Psychology Review

By Power, Thomas J. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, May 2009 | Go to article overview

Selecting Manuscripts for Publication in School Psychology Review


Power, Thomas J., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of articles written by the editors of major NASP publications about how manuscripts are selected for publication and the role that the NASP leadership or office has in that process.

What are the criteria used to select articles for School Psychology Review?

Selection of manuscripts is based upon (a) the significance of the topic being investigated, (b) the extent to which the study makes a unique contribution to the science base, (c) the scientific merit of the study, and (d) the organization and clarity of the presentation.

How are the reviewers chosen?

Upon submission of a manuscript to School Psychology Review, the Editor identifies the action editor who is best suitedto oversee the editorial process. Typically, this decision is based on the match between the topic and methodology of the paper and the areas of expertise of the action editor. The action editor, who is typically the Editor or Associate Editor, then selects four individuals to serve as reviewers. At least two of these reviewers should be members of the Editorial Advisory Board. The action editor typically selects reviewers who are familiar with the content and/or methodology described in the manuscript.

To what extent do the personal views of the reviewers affect the selection process?

In keeping with the academic tradition, reviewers are requested to make an objective decision based upon the importance, innovativeness, and scientific rigor of the study and the presentation of the manuscript, and not based upon their personal beliefs or agenda.

To what extent does NASP as an association have a perspective that guides the selection process?

Determining the importance of the topic addressed by a manuscript is based to a large extent upon priorities that have been establishedby NASP and other school psychology organizations. For example, the five goals outlined by the Futures Conference in School Psychology clearly outline the priorities of NASP and our profession (Dawson et al., 2004). The leadership team of School Psychology Review is fully committed to publishing research that directly addresses these goals (Power, 2006). Consistent with the Futures Goals, the Blueprint for Training and Practice-Ill further delineates priorities for our profession that are useful in determining the significance of work submitted for publication (Ysseldyke et al., 2006).

To what extent do the leadership and/or staff of NASP influence the selection process?

The leadership and staff of NASP do not have direct influence on the selection of manuscripts for publication. …

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