Chronology: Regional Affairs

The Middle East Journal, Winter 1995 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Regional Affairs


See also, Arab-Israeli Conflict, Iraq, Lebanon

1994

July 18: In Buenos Aires, at least 37 people were killed, 127 wounded, and 56 reported missing in an explosion at the offices of the Delegation of the Argentine Israeli Association and the Israeli Mutual Association. A German citizen and an Iranian citizen were arrested in connection with the bombing. [7/19 NYT, WP, 7/21 NYT]

July 19: Turkey and Russia signed an agreement to settle a $480 million Russian debt to be repaid in cash and barter over two years. [7/20 FT]

July 21: In Buenos Aires, 15,000 people demonstrated to protest the 18 July bombing. The death toll rose to 44, and 50 people were still missing. [7/22 NYT]

July 21: A Lebanese-based Islamic group called the Partisans of God claimed responsibility for the Buenos Aires bombing. [7/23 NYT]

July 4: In Tehran, Turkish president Suleyman Demirel met with Iranian president Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani to discuss bilateral relations. [7/25 FBIS]

July 25: The death toll for the Buenos Aires bombing rose to 80, with 24 people missing and presumed dead, and 231 injured. [7/26 FT]

July 26: A car bomb exploded in front of the Israeli embassy in London, wounding fourteen people. [7/27 NYT, FT]

Argentine police detained the owner of the van used in the Buenos Aires bombing, as the death toll rose to 96. [7/27 WSJ]

July 27: In St. Louis, Palestinian immigrants Tawfiq Musa, Luie Nijmah, and Saif Nijmah pleaded guilty to racketeering, illegally purchasing weapons, obstructing investigations, and helping to plan terrorist acts on behalf of the Abu Nidal group. [7/28 NYT]

A car bomb exploded in London's Finchley area outside Balfour House, a building that housed Israeli and Jewish organizations, wounding five people. Israeli officials criticized British security for Israeli and Jewish organizations, to which the British government responded by stationing 24-hour armed police guards at more than one hundred Israeli and Jewish sites. Extra guards were also added at Israeli and Jewish sites in Paris. [7/28 FT, NYT]

Argentine police questioned two Iranian citizens in connection with the 18 July bombing. [7/28 NYT]

July 28: Israeli foreign minister Shimon Peres blamed Iran for the bombings in Argentina and London, and US secretary of state Warren Christopher implied involvement by the Iranian government and the Hizballah. Lebanese prime minister Rafiq al-Hariri held an emergency cabinet session, alerting ministries to possible Israeli retaliatory attacks in southern Lebanon. [7/29 NYT]

In Cyprus, Israeli foreign minister Peres met with Greek Cypriot president Glavkos Kliridhis to discuss bilateral relations. [7/29 FBIS]

July 29: Argentine police detained three Buenos Aires men in connection with the 18 July bombing. [7/31 NYT]

July 30: Egyptian president Husni Mubarak and Saudi Arabia's King Fahd met to discuss bilateral relations. [8/1 FBIS]

July 31: In an interview with al-Hayar (London), Muhammad al-Hijazi, secretary of the Libyan General People's Committee for Justice and Public Security, announced that a joint Egyptian-Libyan security committee had been formed to search for missing Libyan dissident Mansur Kikhia, who was kidnapped from Cairo on 13 December 1993. [8/2 FBIS]

Aug. 7: Pakistan's prime minister Benazir Bhutto met with Saudi Arabia's King Fahd to discuss bilateral issues. [8/8 FBIS]

Aug. 8: Federal Argentine judge Juan Jose Galeano reportedly found evidence linking Iranian diplomats to the 18 July bombing. [8/9 NYT]

Aug. 9: Argentine judge Galeano ordered the arrest of four employees of the Iranian embassy, Ahmad Allameh Falsafi, Mahvash Monsef Gholamreza, Abbas Zarrabi Khorasani, and Akbar Parvaresh, in connection with the 18 July bombing. [8/10 WP]

Kuwait and Russia signed an agreement on joint military cooperation and Kuwaiti purchase of Russian weapons for its land forces. …

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