Book Reviews -- the Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication Edited by William R. Cupach and Brian H. Spitzberg

By Fischer, Judith L. | Journal of Marriage and Family, February 1995 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- the Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication Edited by William R. Cupach and Brian H. Spitzberg


Fischer, Judith L., Journal of Marriage and Family


The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication. William R. Cupach & Brian H. Spitzberg (Eds.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 1994, 408 pp. ISBN 0-8058-1167-2 $69.95 cloth.

This edited volume employs the metaphor of the dark side to explore underdeveloped areas of research on interpersonal relationships. Some aspects of the dark side, such as family violence, have been studied by family scholars for several decades, and have been discussed by psychodynamic psychologists for even longer. Nonetheless, as noted in this volume, the emerging field of close relationships has focused more attention on the positive side of close relationships than on the dark side.

Steve Duck describes the conceptual framework for the volume in the first chapter. Duck introduces several themes that reappear in later chapters of the book and he does so in a witty and stylish manner. One of the most important themes is that the dark side needs to be viewed as normative and functional; the dark side is as much a part of relationships as the positive side. As this theme is played out in other chapters, it reminds the reader of the approach to human development that sees growth as one possible outcome emerging from dialectical processes--processes that are integrative of seemingly opposing experiences.

Duck also provides a taxonomy of the dark side with intentionality as one of the dimensions. The theme of intention of the actor occurs again in later chapters such as Vangelisti's on hurtful messages and the chapter by O'Hair and Cody on deception. Both chapters discuss attributions, but neither explicitly invokes the idea of "distress maintaining attributions" that has illuminated (and frustrated intervention in) distressed marital relationships. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- the Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication Edited by William R. Cupach and Brian H. Spitzberg
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.