That's My Bank

By Jorde, Terry J. | Independent Banker, November 2006 | Go to article overview

That's My Bank


Jorde, Terry J., Independent Banker


A few weeks ago, while attending a piano performance in my hometown of Cando, N.D., I noticed a woman a few rows ahead of me in the auditorium sitting with an adorable red-headed, freckled boy. They stood out to me for a couple of reasons. First, I had never seen her before, which is pretty unusual when you live in a town of 1,300 people. And second, her son, who appeared to be around eight years old, sat quietly throughout a 90-mi nute piano concert without the fidgeting and whining that would have besieged my own children when they were his age.

I approached her after the concert to compliment her on her son's manners, and I asked her if she was new in town. She told me that she had just moved back to the area and was living in Devils Lake, a tow n approximately 40 miles from Cando where we happen to have a branch. I introduced myself, we shook hands and I told her that I worked in Devils Lake a few days a week at CountryBank USA.

Her eyes brightened, a smile came across her face and she exclaimed, "Really? Well, that's my bank!" Without asking me what I did at the bank she proceeded to tell me how much she loves the bank, how friendly everyone has been to them, and how her son loves coming to the bank and being a part of the CountryKids Club.

I only live a couple of blocks from the auditorium, but I'm pretty sure that my feet never touched the sidewalk as I floated home that afternoon. As I thought about what she said, and later shared it with my staff, I realized that she had given us the ultimate compliment. …

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