A Perfect Match: In-Home Staffing Agencies Can Pair Care to Client for Best Results

By Loar, Lynn | Aging Today, March/April 2009 | Go to article overview

A Perfect Match: In-Home Staffing Agencies Can Pair Care to Client for Best Results


Loar, Lynn, Aging Today


Problem: "I fired the helper you sent because she talked all the time. And she came late. She ate all the food in the refrigerator, watched television and argued with her children on her cellphone. Between the television and the cellphone, she didn 't hear me calling her"

Solution: "My mother was dissatisfied with every helper the agency sent but could never explain specifically what was wrong. Then, we found the checklists on www.safehelpinyourhome.org. These lists offered structure and details that allowed us to pinpoint what was annoying her and we were then able to convey this information to the staffing agency. This helped enormously, and the aides can now do their jobs successfully. My mom 's satisfied, the aides know how to please her and the agency knows how to make good matches.

- A Relieved Daughter in California

As aging people face illness or infirmity, often their greatest wish is to remain in the comfort and security of their own home. In-home care can make this wish come true but, for many in-home care staffing agencies, matching caregiver and client can be fraught with difficulty. Agencies may be short-staffed and have limited resources; and in-home helpers shoulder great responsibility and often work in isolation with clients who are vulnerable, anxious, depressed or difficult to please. To make the best match, agencies must assess the help their clients need, the qualities they value in a caregiver and - just as important - the skills and preferences of prospective caregivers.

A standard needs assessment reveals what daily activities prospective clients want help with, but cannot supply enough information to make good matches. Clients and their aides spend much one-on-one time togetiier, and irritations can occur. To minimize friction and promote harmony, find out exactly how clients want to be helped and the qualities they desire in a helper. Clients may say generally mat mey want someone to clean and help around the house, but this information is incomplete. Competent aides, though proficient at their jobs, may displease clients because they do not know their clients' idiosyncratic preferences. Clients may not give their aides sufficient direction or feedback, but instead complain about inadequate performance and dissatisfaction to the agency, friends and family. Take temperament and interpersonal styles into account while considering matches to minimize dissatisfaction and increase satisfaction between client and caregiver.

ASSESSING FOR SUCCESS

Learn both your clients' and employees' preferences. If an aide spends time doing chores he or she dislikes - and me client is dissatisfied as a result- the aide still will be paid and the client still will receive the requested services, but no one - not caregiver, client or agency really benefits from this type of match.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Perfect Match: In-Home Staffing Agencies Can Pair Care to Client for Best Results
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.