Coping with Early Stage Dementia

By Cherry, Debra; Feingold, Nicole | Aging Today, March/April 2009 | Go to article overview

Coping with Early Stage Dementia


Cherry, Debra, Feingold, Nicole, Aging Today


Decades ago, people diagnosed with middle- or late-stage dementia often would be placed in nursing homes, one of the few available care options. Mostly these "patients" were elderly and had been cared for at home. Not until the dementia advanced did families seek outside services. Recently, though, heightened public awareness about Alzheimer's disease has grown. Significant progress is being made in diagnosis and treatment techniques resulting in larger numbers of people seeking medical attention and receiving accurate diagnoses at earlier stages of illness.

Today, people living with early stage impairment may have great insight into their condition. They can be articulate and engaged in the community. They do not fit into existing service paradigms of caregiver support groups or Alzheimer'sfocused adult daycare centers. These individuals often are still mentally intact but struggle with common daily activities.

After people are diagnosed with early stage dementia, they must face the devastation of gradually losing their mental faculties, memories and personalities and of being a burden to their loved ones. They need support services that match their levels of capacity, not services that explicitly highlight their future of incapacity. The Alzheimer's Association and a host of community agencies now have forged partnerships to offer diverse services to persons with middle to late-stage dementia disease.

COPING WITH CHALLENGES

An early onset diagnosis, whether of Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia, usually causes dramatic disruption in families. The Alzheimer's Association's report, 2009 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, estimates that of the 5.3 million people who are currently living with Alzheimer's disease, as many as 200,000 are under age 65. These younger onset individuals in the early stages of the disease face loss of income and insurance, and reduction or loss of retirement benefits at the height of their life responsibilities. They can expect increased expenses for their treatment and care, with insurance and other benefits being difficult to obtain and more expensive for tiiose diagnosed with dementia.

Regardless of age, the emotional toll of a dementia diagnosis can be overwhelming. In addition to the frustrations individuals experience when others cannot understand their situation, there is often a sense of dread and uncertainty about what the future holds. People living wim early stage Alzheimer's, or a related disorder, feel guilt about turning loved ones into caregivers and the impacts may be especially profound for spouses.

Most people with early diagnoses continue living at home even as the disease progresses over an extended period of time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coping with Early Stage Dementia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.