The AJS Justice Award

Judicature, March/April 2009 | Go to article overview

The AJS Justice Award


For many years AfS has maintained a program of giving awards to outstanding people or organizations who have demonstrated their commitment to the core values of AJS to ensure a fair, impartial, independent judiciary, and to educate the public and build confidence in the justice system. Our highest award, the Justice Award, was bestowed upon former Attorney General of the United States Janet Reno at a ceremony in Washington D.C. on April 17, 2009.

The honorary chair of this event was President William J, Clinton, who nominated Janet Reno as Attorney General of the United States in February 1993. She was again appointed to that position in 1997 by President Clinton and served until 2001, becoming the longest-serving attorney general of the 20th century.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., who served as General Reno's Deputy Attorney General from 19972001, delivered remarks acknowledging her unique and historic contributions. Holder heaped high praise on Ms. Reno for her famous tenacity and tireless work schedule during an often controversial eightyear tenure. "She never asked what was the easy or expethent, popular, or politically palpable thing to do," when making decisions, he said. "She only asked, 'What's the right thing to do?'"

The award ceremony featured live performances of selections from "Song of America," a collection of traditional and contemporary music charting the full arc of American history, which was conceived by Janet Reno and produced by her nephew, musician Ed Pettersen. The Georgetown University Concert Choir also graced the authence with a stirring performance of "Go Down, Moses."

Both before and after her service as attorney general, Janet Reno has worked tirelessly to ensure that justice was done in the criminal justice system and worked with AJS and other institutions to seek out and reform procedures that have led to wrongful convictions. Kirk Noble Bloodsworth of The Justice Project, the first person in the U.S. to have his capital conviction overturned as a result of DNA testing, delivered keynote remarks reflecting on his long struggle to prove his innocence and the need for further improvements to scientific and forensic evidence utilized by courts. Morris Dees, Founder and Chief Trial Counsel of the Southern Poverty Law Center, delivered remarks focusing on Janet Reno's courageous decisions and actions as attorney general, especially in the face of heated criticism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The AJS Justice Award
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.