Researching 'Comparative Effectiveness' of Treatments

By Smerd, Jeremy | Workforce Management, April 6, 2009 | Go to article overview

Researching 'Comparative Effectiveness' of Treatments


Smerd, Jeremy, Workforce Management


"Currently, patients and their physicians have little, if any, Independent, reliable information comparing the efficacy of various procedures, therapies or devices." -HELEN DARUNO, president, National Business Group on Health, In a statement

TUCKED INSIDE the recently signed economic stimulus package is a line item that is much smaller than the $19 billion slated to bring doctors into the information age. But the provision could go a long way toward helping employers spend their health care dollars more wisely.

The federal government has committed $1.1 billion to compare the effectiveness of different drugs, medical devices and surgeries to treat the same illness.

This "comparative effectiveness" research could eventually help employers identify the most cost-effective and beneficial health care treatments, and then steer patients toward them. Employers could save money and improve the health of patients by paying for procedures that are considered to be of great benefit while not covering treatments that have proved to be of little value.

Without comparative effectiveness research, decisions about what treatments to use often "depend on anecdotal evidence, conjecture and the experience and judgment of the individual physicians involved," according to a policy paper published by the Congressional Budget Office in 2007.

For example: Which is the more cost-effective and better treatment for a patient suffering from acid reflux disease, one of the most common conditions affecting older Americans? Is it medicine or surgery? In 2005, the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in its first comparative effectiveness review, said drugs can be as effective as surgery in preventing stomach acid from being regurgitated.

The agency continues to review the effectiveness of treatments for other diseases or conditions, such as the use of noninvasive procedures to detect breast cancer. In 2006, the agency reported that four types of tests - magnetic resonance imaging being one of them - were not accurate enough to replace biopsies.

"The research could lead to objective criteria that says these treatments work and these do not," says Jim Winkler, a health care consultant with Hewitt Associates.

The lack of comparative effectiveness research helps explain why the quality and cost of care varies drastically across the country, the CBO report said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Researching 'Comparative Effectiveness' of Treatments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.